Republicans Dismiss Obama’s State of the Union as More of the Same

'The president made more promises that sound good, but won’t solve the problems actually facing Americans'

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The State of the Union belongs to the president. But every member of Congress tries to snag a share of the spotlight, so the moment Barack Obama was finished speaking—and in some cases, well before—Republicans blasted out a blizzard of withering criticism over TV, Twitter and more.

The official GOP reponse was delivered by Washington state Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, the chairwoman of the House Republican Conference and the majority’s fourth-ranking member. “Tonight the president made more promises that sound good, but won’t solve the problems actually facing Americans,” she said, sitting on a gold-embroidered couch in front of a fireplace in the Capitol. Instead, McMorris Rodgers outlined the GOP’s competing vision: “One that champions free markets—and trusts people to make their own decisions, not a government that decides for you. It helps working families rise above the limits of poverty and protects our most vulnerable. And it’s one where Washington plays by the same rules that you do.”

The fifth-term Republican from Washington was selected, party leaders said, for her compelling biography and legislative accomplishments. The mother of three children, including a son with Down syndrome, she provides a visual counterpoint to the Democratic contention that the GOP is waging a “war on women.”

McMorris Rodgers hijacked one of Obama’s themes by outlining a vision for a “year of real action,” one marked by border security-driven immigration reforms. And she tweaked the president’s focus on income inequality by pledging to close the “real gap we face today, one of opportunity inequality,” through school choice and job training.

Utah Republican Sen. Mike Lee delivered a separate response on behalf of tea party activists, geared toward “Americans who may feel they’ve been forgotten by both political parties.” He assailed what he called a federal government that “thinks it’s OK to lie to, spy on and even target its own citizens.”

“The president’s lofty rhetoric ignored the fact that his policies continue to leave poor families behind,” Lee said, arguing Obama’s focus on income inequality ignores that the inequality “comes from government.”

-with reporting from Dan Hirschhorn

22 comments
MarkWilliams2
MarkWilliams2

I feel sorry for all of America, as long as we look to either party to help us, instead of us helping ourselves, we are in big trouble. Both parties take care of those with power and money and "We The People" get dumped on. Until there are term limits and all of the Public sector (including politicians) play by the exact same rules, the gap from the have to the have not’s will continue to GROW.

mantisdragon91
mantisdragon91

And speaking of the GOP.  Two tales of GOP class acts from last night.


Ultra-wingnut Rep. Steve Stockman walks out halfway through Obama’s State of the Union address

As has been the case with Rep. Stockman's campaign for Senate, the Texan was nowhere to be found

GOP Rep. Michael Grimm isn’t sorry for threatening to break a reporter in half and throw him off a balcony

"I doubt that I am the first Member of Congress to tell off a reporter, and I am sure I won’t be the last"


AlphaJuliette
AlphaJuliette

Hmmmm......"Republicans Dismiss Obama’s State of the Union as More of the Same"

The Republican party dismissing Obama....more of the same.


xpst
xpst

Strange that she said nothing about abortion, which is what the House Republicans are actually focused on.  On Tuesday, the House voted for greater restrictions for federal funding of abortions.  


Seems a bit hypocritical to say that Obama's plans won’t solve the problems actually facing Americans.

mantisdragon91
mantisdragon91

The GOP would dismiss the fact that the Earth is round if it was brought up by Obama.  Parties of no ideas and no future tend to do that.

Paul,nnto
Paul,nnto

Watching her response last night I was struck by the thought that the "response" must have been written sometime last week. 


Biography+slogans+one tired "secure the borders". Good thing for the republicans no one cares about the SOTU response. 

sacredh
sacredh

" Instead, McMorris Rodgers outlined the GOP’s competing vision: “One that champions free markets—and trusts people to make their own decisions, not a government that decides for you. It helps working families rise above the limits of poverty and protects our most vulnerable. And it’s one where Washington plays by the same rules that you do.”

Shorter version: Life's a b!tch if you're not rich.

j45ashton
j45ashton

Yes, and America dismisses the Republicans as more of the same.


Did anyone actually listen to the so-called Republican response from Cathy Rodgers?  3/4s of it was about her & her family.  I guess the state of the union is really all about her.  There was one policy specific.  Fence off our borders.  The rest was a vague sales pitch telling us that the GOP has great proposals, really great.


This underscores that the Republican party really has nothing to offer but smoke & mirrors.  The center of the party is filled with absolute mush when it comes to policy.  And the tea party/libertarian side is dominated by extremist nuts.


Certain interest groups should take note...when Obama spoke to immigration, the standing of women and supporting the unemployed or underpaid, Boehner didn't move a millimeter.  And when he did applaud anything it was with the kind of enthusiasm he might show at his own funeral.


A dud party being led by a dud.


manlyman
manlyman

@mantisdragon91 Actually you aint  far off mancy. If he said the grass was green I'd have to look for myself.

deedowdd
deedowdd

@mantisdragon91We have had plenty of Ideas and laid them on the table but the king won't give an inch

Sparrow55
Sparrow55

@sacredh My interpretation of the GOP response was "Tax cuts, tax cuts, more tax cuts.....oh, and build a fence to keep all the Mexicans out." 

MrObvious
MrObvious

@sacredh 

Seems like their 'response' was more of the pre-packaged GOP slop they always yammer on about. Apparently by allowing the poor to sink it helps them the most.

AlphaJuliette
AlphaJuliette

@sacredh

I'm sure they sincerely believe that cutting food stamps and ending unemployment benefits for the long term unemployed "helps working families rise above the limits of poverty and protects our most vulnerable." 

I shake my head in wonder.

Sparrow55
Sparrow55

@MrObvious@sacredhI think the GOP's twist on John Kennedy's quote about a rising tide lifting all boats is "a rising tide creates more water to drown the poor and middle class." 

DarleneRitterGoodfellow
DarleneRitterGoodfellow

@AlphaJuliette@sacredh Cognitive dissonance is a common GOP affliction, like Michele Bachmann arguing in the same CNN segment she was against raising the minimum wage, yet she wants wages to go up.

DarleneRitterGoodfellow
DarleneRitterGoodfellow

Well, of course they should do it, they can afford it but they don't and won't until the government, be it state or federal, forces their hand. I think it is long past time to raise the federal minimum wage to a living wage level. $10.10 is not high enough but it is a good start. But back to m point, Michele is pretty clueless to the fact that the easiest way to achieve her stated desire for higher wages is by, you know, raising the minimum wage.

AlphaJuliette
AlphaJuliette

@DarleneRitterGoodfellow

Actually I agree with Michelle.  And the president himself mentioned it last night. 

Wage increases are rightfully the responsibility of the private sector and not of government.  With record profits for corporations and small business rebounding there should be more money available to distribute to employees.  The fact is that wages have been stagnant for many years.  The average wage earner has not benefitted from the vast amounts of money that is being made out there.