GOP Governors Call for Party Redirection, New Focus On Less Fortunate

Purdue University President Mitch Daniels called our debt, the "largest non military danger we’ve ever faced."

  • Share
  • Read Later
Michael Bonfigli /The Christian Science Monitor

President of Purdue University Mitch Daniels

When a reporter asked Mitch Daniels, the former Republican governor of Indiana, what the country is doing to inhibit growth at a Christian Science Monitor breakfast held in Washington on Wednesday, he responded, “What are we doing that isn’t?”

The current president of Purdue University called the national debt an “overriding threat,” which he says will weigh more heavily on the poor, middle class, and young people. But in order to face that threat head-on, Daniels said, lawmakers should set aside their differences and focus on finding middle ground to fix the economy. “I think we should adopt policies specifically in the interests of the yet-to-haves in this country,” said Daniels. “People of very different views ought to come together and say look, we’ve got to call every close one and break every tie in favor of what will allow the private economy to grow faster.”

Daniels statements on behalf of the so-called yet-to-haves, who often include racial minorities, the low-income, the poor, and the elderly, came on the heels of Ohio governor John Kasich’s interview with the New York Times, in which he declared that there is a “war on the poor” in America by his fellow Republicans in Washington. “You know what?” said Kasich, who worked against the state legislature to expand Medicaid in the state. “The very people who complain ought to ask their grandparents if they worked at the W.P.A.”

Finding middle ground and advocating for the poor are themes Republican governors have been pushing in the wake of the growing divide within the party, something the 16-day government shutdown members of the GOP started only seemed to escalate.

Amid the shutdown, the Republican Governor’s Association launched the “American Comeback” campaign to highlight the accomplishments of GOP leaders outside of Washington. Republican Governors Chris Christie of New Jersey and Scott Walker of Wisconsin decried the failures of leadership and highlighted the efforts they’ve made to solve issues and work together. Over the summer, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder signed Medicaid expansion into law after the bill passed with the bipartisan support within that state legislature.

As reports, polls, and pundits continue to suggest that division within the Republican Party will break it down, state lawmakers have been working to show that it’s not too late to keep that from happening.

“We are not going to be either an economically successful country…or a frankly societally harmonious country at 1 or 2% growth rates,” Daniels said on Wednesday. “It will destroy something bigger than the middle class. It will destroy the sense of upward mobility or sense of cohesiveness that we’ve always been blessed with.”

15 comments
RationalActor
RationalActor

"It will destroy the sense of upward mobility or sense of cohesiveness that we’ve always been blessed with.”

The "sense" of upward stability? Excuse me but that sounds very wishy-washy. In fact, it reminds me of a quote by Heinline: When a man speaks of his honor, make him pay cash.

Here it is applied because like every regressive attempt to redistribute cash upward - er, pardon, i mean "improve the economy" there are never any details. Maybe because the details are "drink the water and let the piss trickle down".

That's a hard sell... just a "sense" i'm getting.

GaryReber
GaryReber

America has tried the Republican “cut spending, cut taxes, and cut ‘entitlements’” and the Democrat “protect ‘entitlements,’ provide tax-payer supported stimulus, lower middle and working class taxes, tax the rich and redistribute” brands of economic policy, as well as a mixture of both. Republican ideology aims to revive hard-nosed laissez-faire appeals to hard-core conservatives but ignores the relevancy of healing the economy and halting the steady disintegration of the middle class and working poor.

Some conservative thinkers have acknowledged the damaging results of a laissez-faire ideology, which furthers the concentration of productive capital ownership. They are floundering in search of alternative thinking as they acknowledge the negative economic and social realities resulting from greed capitalism. This acknowledgment encompasses the realization that the troubling economic and social trends (global capitalism, free-trade doctrine, tectonic shifts in the technologies of production and the steady off-loading of American manufacturing and jobs) caused by continued concentrated ownership of productive capital will threaten the stability of contemporary liberal democracies and dethrone democratic ideology as it is now understood.

Every policy, whether it relates to cutting taxes, retaining current tax levels, dealing with corporate taxes, etc. should be structured to result in the full payout of corporate profits to the share owners, who would then pay personal income tax rates, and the financing of FUTURE productive capital assets investment to broaden private sector individual citizen ownership.

Without a policy shift to broaden productive capital ownership simultaneously with economic growth, further development of technology and globalization will undermine the American middle class and make it impossible for more than a minority of citizens to achieve middle-class status. 

MrObvious
MrObvious

There's already a party for that, the dems. GOP can stick with what it has become - a small tent for greed, avarice and crazy. It's what they do best. We don't need half arse baked ideas for poor people.

We got the blue dog dems for that.

sacredh
sacredh

Living here in Ohio, I've had the misfortune of hearing governor Kasich on a constant basis. I think his new-found "worry" about the poor is just a re-election tactic. He got his @ss handed to him on plate because of his war on unions and the middle class. His current actions sound more like getting the message rather than an honest conversion based on principle.

sacredh
sacredh

There was always going to be a war between the establishment GOP and the Tea Party sooner or later. It looks like sooner.

PaulRickter
PaulRickter

@GaryReber The one thing you missed is that we are attempting, for the first time in the last 100 years, to recover from a recession while at the same time *reducing* total government employment (at all levels, local, state, and federal). Every other time we were recovering from a recession, including the 1983 recovery under conservative hero Ronald Reagan, increasing government employment was part of what got us out of the doldrums. And if you grafted an increase in government employment (instead of the decrease we've been seeing) comparable to 1983 onto the current recovery, you'd see a recovery that is comparable to the 1983 recovery. But because Republicans hate government and have sufficient control at the local, state, and federal level to block sensible measures that both Democrats and Republicans have done in the past to recover from recessions (increasing short-term government employment as a way of stimulating the economy across the board), we're stuck in the doldrums and waiting for private-sector employment to gradually recover, which will take a generation.

I guess we can hope that under President Christie, Republicans forgot how much they hate government and instead embrace the sort of short-term economy-boosting steps that have worked in the past, even though they've blocked President Obama from doing them since they won back control of Congress in 2010. Otherwise, we're screwed until voters tire of electing government-hating sociopaths.

russej
russej

Golden hammer award to you sir.  You have nailed it.

S_Deemer
S_Deemer

@sacredh : Now the TP has a new group to attack: GOP Governors. How long until they form a circular firing squad?

outsider
outsider

@sacredh 


I thought it would be in congress though, not Gubernatorial vs congress.. 

GaryReber
GaryReber

@PaulRickter @GaryReber America has tried the Republican “cut spending, cut taxes, and cut ‘entitlements’” and the Democrat “protect ‘entitlements,’ provide tax-payer supported stimulus, lower middle and working class taxes, tax the rich and redistribute” brands of economic policy, as well as a mixture of both. Republican ideology aims to revive hard-nosed laissez-faire appeals to hard-core conservatives but ignores the relevancy of healing the economy and halting the steady disintegration of the middle class and working poor.

Some conservative thinkers have acknowledged the damaging results of a laissez-faire ideology, which furthers the concentration of productive capital ownership. They are floundering in search of alternative thinking as they acknowledge the negative economic and social realities resulting from greed capitalism. This acknowledgment encompasses the realization that the troubling economic and social trends (global capitalism, free-trade doctrine, tectonic shifts in the technologies of production and the steady off-loading of American manufacturing and jobs) caused by continued concentrated ownership of productive capital will threaten the stability of contemporary liberal democracies and dethrone democratic ideology as it is now understood.

Sadly, there are so many thoughtful minds, that do not and cannot see an alternative to constant government spending sourced from taxpayer extraction and incurred national debt––in the name of "jobs (make-work) creation." But there is one––and conceptually it is simplistic. We need to be making EVERY American rIcher and not by entitlements, but by extending to them access to returns on their investments thus eliminating the entitlement mentality altogether and the theft from others property that supports it. But while the vast majority, essentially the 99 percent own no investments, the task is to enact policies that simultaneously grow the economy while creating new owners of wealth-creating, income-producing productive capital assets, and preventing the further concentration of such assets among the 1 percent, who now OWN America. The end result will be that citizens would become empowered as owners to meet their own consumption needs and government would become more dependent on economically independent citizens, thus reversing current global trends where all citizens will eventually become dependent for their economic well-being on our only legitimate monopoly –– the State –– and whatever elite controls the coercive powers of government.

Without a policy shift to broaden productive capital ownership simultaneously with economic growth, further development of technology and globalization will undermine the American middle class and make it impossible for more than a minority of citizens to achieve middle-class status. 

sacredh
sacredh

@outsider, I think this goes much further than just house, senate, gubernatorial or presidential in scope. It's looking like we're going to wind up with a true three party system.