Republicans Divided in Renewed Fight Over Obamacare Funding

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U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz speaks during the "Exempt America from Obamacare" rally in Washington, D.C., Sept. 10, 2013.

The fight over the Affordable Care Act has once again been put front-and-center in Washington, only this time, Republicans are taking opposing sides in the argument.

On Friday, the House approved a plan to fund federal agencies past Sept. 30, including a clause that would strip funding from the Affordable Care Act, according to the Washington Post.

Next week, House leaders will go a step further by advancing a measure that demands a one-year delay in the Affordable Care Act’s implementation, according to the Post. In return, Republicans would agree to help avert the nation’s first-ever debt default sometime next month.

While neither of these plans are likely to pass through the Senate, for the first time there is a definitive split in the GOP stance on ‘Obamacare’, with some 2016 contenders begrudgingly accepting that the law is here to stay.

On Saturday, Kentucky Republican Sen. Rand Paul told a crowd in Michigan that the health care law isn’t likely be repealed or defunded. He also said there aren’t many options left for Republicans who want to put the brakes on its implementation.

That’s in contrast to fellow Republican senators Ted Cruz of Texas and Marco Rubio of Florida, who’ve repeatedly said that they support defunding the health care law, even if it leads to a partial government shutdown.

Writing at the conservative website Breitbart.com this weekend, former Alaska governor Sarah Palin rallied behind them, writing, “Right now, Ted Cruz is speaking for us in this Obamacare fight. God bless him for it.”

Meanwhile, GOP strategist Karl Rove told a Michigan crowd this weekend that Republicans have to offer an alternative to the health care law.

“We’re really good at describing what’s wrong with Obamacare,” Rove said, according to USA Today. “But there’s one thing that we’re lousy at and we need to get better at, and that is describing what we are for.”

Even Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain seems to have given up on the Obamacare fight, admitting on Friday that the Senate is not going to repeal or defund the health care. “And to think we can is not rational.”

[Washington Post]

[CNN]

[USA Today]

12 comments
Tommy34684
Tommy34684

The gridlock can't be fixed until the voters in Kentucky wake up and retire their senator.

PaulRossi
PaulRossi

How about if the Republicans in Congress stop wasting time and our taxpayer's dollars trying to overturn Obamacare, and get their best and brightest (not the tired out, obstructionist old schoolers) to figure out ways to streamline Obamacare, making it more effective and efficient, and benefitting more people? How about making health care about health first and foremost and not profit?  Imagine the Republicans making a positive contribution to the process!

smehgol
smehgol

Not the one percent and not the least of us. No American should be denied health care. Our Constitution would have so decreed had today's medicine existed when it was written and amended. Let us not forsake the most vulnerable among us and their children. For what do we have structures of government, for what do we have institutions of state, if not to hold up all the citizenry, and especially the most vulnerable?

smehgol
smehgol

The One Percent have usurped control, disenfranchised most of us, and moved our nation into plutocracy and continuing wars against our interests. Resurgence of American democracy, opportunity and vibrancy requires replacing Bush's gross tax break for the rich with a steeply progressive rate on all income. That includes dividends, carried interest, capital gains and, for the One Percent, wealth too. However did tax on unearned income get to be lower than on earned income? Zeroing out the Jewish state's enormous extorted subsidy would reduce international hostility toward America and thereby justify many more reductions.

j45ashton
j45ashton

When the Boston Tea Party occurred, most of the colonies were ready to revolt over subjugation & taxation.   We have a very different situation today.  Most of the country is not up in arms over taxation.  Just a vocal minority.  

Who are these grassroot  people who are so furious, so angry?  I've known a few of them for many years.  They've struggled in their lives, have been greatly frustrated and for some reason have chosen to vent their frustrations at the government.  As if the government has been the cause of their struggles & difficulties.  

The rich within the tea party are just using the others to help them gain more power & get richer.  

And what do we have within the GOP in congress?  Members who are so desperate to hold onto their own jobs, they capitulate to or use the frustrations of their constituents and then congratulate themselves like immature high schoolers who have just done some senselessly destructive mischief.

jmac
jmac

What's wrong with Obamacare according to Rove?   Death panels?  What part of the Republican private exchanges doesn't he like?  

We all know what the Republicans don't like in the Heritage Foundation/Nixon/ Republican health care  plan because they named it what they don't like - Obama. 

fitty_three
fitty_three

There's only one thing the GOP is for and that's whatever Obama isn't for, regardless of whether it's good or not.

Hell, these nuts are taking pages from the Russian Constitution to justify their stand on food stamps.

Vote those long shoreline features with sand on 'em out of office in 2014.  Let's get RID of Teh Crazy.

Tommy34684
Tommy34684

@PaulRossi One reason this will not happen is it would happen on Obama's watch and that is unacceptable for the Republican Party especially for folks like Senator McCullum and Boehner's right hand man.

aztecian
aztecian

@fitty_three we need to rid this country of the fear mongering obstructionist and usher a new era of socialism and social responsibility.  it is time the 1% pay their fair share.

fitty_three
fitty_three

@aztecian 

I'll settle for the reintroduction of the atmosphere of compromise and actual governance plus the extinction of Teh Crazy.

Yeah, and the closing of the income gap wouldn't hurt one little bit.  It's as big as it's been in 75 years and enough is enough.

fitty_three
fitty_three

@aztecian

I'm not a socialist, but I understand your frustration.  I'd just like to see a return to rational governance.  I think that gap can be closed considerably even without blatant seizure and redistribution. 

I'm all for the rich paying their fare share.  I also would mind if they were indemnified for the damage to the economy that has been done.

It wasn't the middle class that messed it up.