Morning Must Reads: July 10

In the news: Egypt, Syrian rebels, sexual harassment, big banks, the humanities, VA Gov. Robert McDonnell, and the Oval Office

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Mark Wilson / Getty Images

The early morning sun rises behind the US Capitol Building in Washington, DC.

425 comments
ahandout
ahandout

It's amazing (isn't that the word the beehive uses) that liberals here will beotch about how the government subsidizes Wal Mart workers ( I'm not a fan of Wal Mart or it's affect on the US), but they flip flop all over the beach when it comes to subsidizing illegals.

We have know the cost of illegals in California for years.  Why do you think that the state is broke?  I mean other than the idiot liberals who tax and spend the state into debt; but I digress. 

Illegal Immigration Costs California Over Ten Billion Annually

http://usgovinfo.about.com/od/immigrationnaturalizatio/a/caillegals.htm

forgottenlord
forgottenlord

OT: Just saw a screening (6th screening in a year, my wife is a maestro) of Pacific Rim.  Save your money.  Some idiot must've said "I want to see 20 meter tall machines with clearly 21st century technology wrestling each other......as intelligent war strategy.  Give me a way to do that" and somebody else threw an excuse plot together and filled it with every action cliche he could think of.  My wife, who was completely hyped about the movie and loves dumb action far more than I do, fell asleep during the climax.  In an IMAX theater.  And when I say she fell asleep during the climax, I mean the last thing she saw was one guy dueling two enemies in the final battle right before a big explosion (she didn't see the explosion).

ahandout
ahandout

More and more illegals are taking skilled jobs.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/01/20/us-usa-immigrants-employmentexclusive-idUSTRE70J37P20110120 


Some of those who entered the country since 2008 were employed in sectors that generally require a high level of skills and education, such as finance and insurance.

But the 28,500 new arrivals since 2008 who found work in the finance and insurance sector only comprised 2.6 percent of the 1.1 million migrants. Over 90,000 of the newcomers since 2008 got work in health care and social services, a fast-growing sector where skills are in demand.

sacredh
sacredh

OT again, but I did something last winter that really seems wise in hindsight. I bought these LED lights in chargers that plug into your wall sockets. They don't come on unless your power goes off. The power went off and they all came on.

roknsteve
roknsteve

Why do trolls complain all day and then come back tomorrow?  Trolls are not too bright.

kbanginmotown
kbanginmotown

OT: I think it's interesting how all of us Swampcritters have gravitated almost exclusively to MMR due to the LiveFyre debacle. 

MMR regularly gets 300+ comments, mostly from regulars. Excellent links and comments. 

Only a few brave souls like grape, Ty, sacred, mantis, decon, Paul-nnto, Foggy and a few others venture out into locust-land.

Several posts today have gotten zero comments (granted, one was about the "Kids' State Dinner" - sorry Katy).

Q: Is TIME really OK with this? Or, when are the people responsible for sacking the high-sheriffs going to get sacked?

mantisdragon91
mantisdragon91

 And here are the Redskins yet again following the GOP playbook on opinion polling.

Redskins ask fans loaded question regarding possible name change 

Some polls are aimed at finding out what people really think.  Some polls are intended to make people think a certain thing.

The Redskins have crafted an online fan poll with at least one question that seems to be more about pushing public sentiment in the team’s desire direction instead of finding out what people truly believe.

The questions, shared by Dan Steinberg of the Washington Post, come from a broader online survey.  The first poses in simple “yes” or “no” terms whether the team should change its name.  Then, the survey asks which of the three following statements the reader agrees with the most:  (1) “the name is rooted in racism and is outdated and offensive”; (2) “the name is a unifying force that stands for strength, courage, pride and respect”; and (3) “it is just another team name and doesn’t really matter to me all that much.”

Plenty of people may not completely agree with any of those statements.  Some may agree more with “the name may have been acceptable at first but times have changed and at some point the name should” or “when disconnected from the name of a team, the term ‘redskins’ is inappropriate and offensive” or “in 100 years people will look back on this period of history with amazement that it took us so long to realize the name should be changed.”

But that’s not even the most troubling question.  The last one, a classic political push poll, loads up the team’s position before seeking an answer:  “If you knew that . . . According to the independent institute poll of nearly 1,000 Native Americans, 90% of Native Americans DON’T find the Washington Redskins name offensive . . . and . . . Ten Members of Congress called on the team to change its name because they considered it offensive . . . Should the Washington Redskins change their name?”

The team doesn’t care about the answer to that one.  The goal is to make sure the person responding to the poll can change “if you knew” to “now I know.”

At least it’s better than using the “hey look at all the high schools that use the name” approach, and it’s a definite improvement over using a Chief who isn’t a Chief and may not even be a Native American.

The goal is the same.  The team wants to recruit more fans to become active participants in shouting down anyone who would dare point out that, for example, “the name may have been acceptable at first but times have changed and at some point the name should” or “when disconnected from the name of a team, the term ‘redskins’ is inappropriate and offensive” or “in 100 years people will look back on this period of history with amazement that it took us so long to realize the name should be changed.”

mantisdragon91
mantisdragon91

Mississippi's Secretary of State Moves to Enforce Voter ID Law

With unseemly haste following the Supreme Court's recent nullification of a key provision of the Voting Rights Act, Mississippi's Secretary of State has moved to enforce a new voter identification law that will suppress the vote of African Americans in my home state.

Within hours of the Supreme Court's decision in Shelby County v. Holder, in an email captioned, "This chapter is closed," Secretary of State Delbert Hosemann trumpeted the court's holding that Mississippi need no longer seek U. S. Justice Department pre-clearance for changes to its voting laws. "Mississippi citizens have earned the right to determine our voting processes," he said, even as he announced that the process for implementing the voter ID law "begins today."

Just a few days later, I received Hosemann's letter informing me that he intends to finalize his draft regulations to implement the law on August 1.

Mississippi is not alone. Mississippi, Texas, Alabama and other mostly Deep South jurisdictions were -- until the ruling in Shelby -- covered by the Voting Rights Act's buffer against voter suppression schemes that, back in the day, included poll taxes and literacy tests. Today, these jurisdictions are in a mad rush to implement current versions of voter suppression -- strong testament to the folly of the Supreme Court's decision.

With a weakened Voting Rights Act, we will see immediate effects that not only make it more difficult for eligible voters to cast a ballot, but turn back the clock on the gains in racial and economic justice we've made in the past 50 years.

The pre-clearance provision of the Voting Rights Act was the best tool we had to fight voting laws that discriminate against low-income people and communities of color. Since 2006, the Voting Rights Act has been used to block 31 voting changes that the Department of Justice found discriminatory, not to mention the hundreds of laws that the Voting Rights Act deterred by its mere presence.

The ramifications of the Supreme Court's decision extend far beyond the voting booth. In the Court's opinion, Chief Justice John Roberts points to African American voter registration rates and turnout, and declares that progress on those fronts indicates a need to reevaluate portions of the Voting Rights Act. But the franchise isn't just about a few statistics -- it's about political power and has deep economic and social implications. The right to vote is about true equality. And we are far from it.

Mississippi ranks the lowest in the country in nearly all of the indicators for health, economic security, education and well-being. Our elected officials largely determine the policies that combat these problems and our representatives have let us down in some of the most pressing political issues we are facing today. Last month, the state legislature voted against expanding Medicaid, leaving some 300,000 people without access to health care. Mississippi renewed a payday lending law last year that increased the reliance of low-income borrowers to predatory loans, cementing its ranking as the state with the highest concentration of payday lenders per capita.

These measures hurt all of Mississippi, but they especially devastate low-income communities of color. We need to find a way for our legislators to be more accountable to everyday Mississippians, but the ruling in Shelby makes our elected officials even less responsive to their constituents by allowing laws that could take away the right of eligible citizens to vote. Unless we ensure a fair and equitable way to vote for our representatives, there will be a large segment of the population whose political voices are even more muted. This isn't the time to further divide Mississippi's already segregated and struggling population.

Providing an ID to vote may seem innocuous, but more than one out of every ten eligible voters do not have government-issued ID. A report from the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law, details how difficult it is to obtain a government-issued photo ID, especially for communities of color, low-income people, students and the elderly. To secure government-issued photo ID in Mississippi, many voters will need a birth certificate. Yet, in a maddening Catch-22, the state requires a government-issued photo ID to obtain a certified copy of a birth certificate.

While the Court left the Voting Rights Act severely weakened, there is still some hope. The burden now shifts to civil rights groups to turn to other sections of the Voting Rights Act, such as Sections 2 and 3, and sue when voting laws discriminate against minorities. It will take time and resources, but the civil rights movement is at a crossroads and we can't afford to erase decades of momentum towards racial and economic equality.

Many are now urging Congress to devise an updated formula to determine which areas need federal approval for voting changes. But it isn't just on Congress to act; it is our burden, too. Fifty years after Selma and the March on Washington, we need to fully recognize that the power to vote is not only the power to elect our officials, but also the power to fight racial discrimination and economic inequality.

Sue_N
Sue_N

We've seen the previews. As my husband said, "It looks like Transformers meets Godzilla."

MrObvious
MrObvious

@roknsteve 


Well, trolls do it for emotional reasons. At redstate and similar scummy ponds they're just another insane bleat - here they consider themselves some kind of opposition (to common sense but whatever). And some are even dumb enough to engage them.

sacredh
sacredh

Mentioning my name in the same sentence as soul is a very curious thing to do kbang. OT, but our power just came back on. It's been off for hours. We had a tornado watch, 50-60 mph winds, hail and heavy rain. My yard is trashed and so are my trees.

TyPollard
TyPollard

@kbanginmotown 

It really has steadily become more and more crazy in the comment section over the year. 

It is sad and fascinating like a slow motion car crash. 

Maybe if Time cared about putting out a good product....

paulejb
paulejb

@mantisdragon91 

The filibuster is the only defense against Obama's attempt to pack the courts with left wing apparatchiks with no use for the US Constitution.

forgottenlord
forgottenlord

@Sue_N 

Pretty much.  I think the mechs are inspired more by the Gundam series than Transformers but... yeah.

sacredh
sacredh

Only 6 million of the 1st year is guaranteed and the 2nd year is a team option, but i agree with you, I wouldn't sign Bynum either.

sacredh
sacredh

I prefer sadism myself, but that's just me.

sacredh
sacredh

I have to give a shout out to the wisdom of my better half. I bought a couple of new rose bushes the other day and wanted to plant them. My wife told me to hold off for a couple of days because the yard was so muddy and she didn't want me out there digging in the mud. Most of our flowers are in shreds. At least the new rose bushes are safe on the porch.

sacredh
sacredh

We had so many candles burning in the house that it looked like a Catholic church during Mass.

ahandout
ahandout

@TyPollard @kbanginmotown Time only regurgitates the party line, and as for a good product, Time has been hocking the same hogwash for years.  It will go the way of Newsweek eventually. Most people don't even bother to read the articles published here, including the so called regulars.

roknsteve
roknsteve

@Sue_N @mantisdragon91 Like I've said before, the Koch bros. and their ilk want us all living at the river and working 12 hours a day for a dollar an hour.

forgottenlord
forgottenlord

@paulejb

Didn't I read something about how normally a President asks Congress for suggestions for the various courts and then uses that to help him shortlist but he's been having trouble getting suggestions from Republicans?

Might explain the excess of left wing picks.

ahandout
ahandout

@sacredh I was surprised that the Lakers were able to unload him.  Not sure if he will ever play any significant ball.  Too bad, he's a great potential talent.  Between his knees and his kinda lackadaisical attitude lies an opening...ball's in your court.

TyPollard
TyPollard

@ahandout @TyPollard @kbanginmotown 

The "party line" is the corporate line, nothing more. 

It is natural selection at work where rich white men promote (usually) other white men and sometimes women that won't rock their financial boat. 

TyPollard
TyPollard

@Sue_N 

and proud of it. 

Nobody loves Texas more than Texans.

Sue_N
Sue_N

Crazy is our particular art form. We will not yield to the formerly sane Carolina.

curt3rd
curt3rd

I am from Mississippi and I can get an I.D. over the internet from the DMV.  They mail it to you overnight. 

Sue_N
Sue_N

@forgottenlord @paulejb Yep. Sen. John Cornyn (R-Ted Cruz's Back Pocket) had whined that a bunch of federal seats in Texas were vacant and it was messing with Texas (which, as we all know, Is Not Done … except by the Texas GOP). Obama pointed out that it is usually up to senators from the states in question to provide suggestions and that the Texas delegation had been rather lax in that regard. Cornyn went slinking back to sit under Cruz's chair after that.

forgottenlord
forgottenlord

@paulejb

Except on his health care plan and his Pentagon plans and a number of other things.

Or do you mean the "right" Republicans?