Despite Early Success, Immigration Bill Faces Uncertain Path Forward

If immigration reform's prospects are bright in the Senate, they remain murky overall.

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Immigrants wait to become American citizens ahead of a naturalization ceremony at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office in New York City, on May 17, 2013.

Success is rare enough in the Senate that a taste of it can make even the most seasoned legislators a little cocky. The week after supporters of immigration reform steered their bipartisan bill through the Senate Judiciary Committee, Majority Leader Harry Reid suggested the package would sail through the Senate when it hits the floor next month. “It’s certainly going to pass the Senate,” he said. “The Republicans can no longer stop this.”

Rounding up a filibuster-proof 60 votes may prove tougher than Reid anticipates; allies say they’re not there yet. But even if Senate Republicans can’t scupper the bill, their counterparts in the GOP-controlled House can. And they won’t go gently. When the Senate committee debating the legislation sent it to the floor largely unscathed, House Republican leaders marked the occasion by dashing any emerging hopes that overhauling the broken U.S. immigration system might be easier than expected. “We will not simply take up and accept a bill that is emerging in the Senate if it passes,” wrote a passel of House leaders, headed by Speaker John Boehner. “Rather, through regular order, the House will work its will and produce its own legislation.”

The missive was a reminder of how messy the process will be. If immigration reform’s prospects are bright in the Senate, they remain murky overall. The easiest way for the bill to pass would be for the House to take up the Senate bill, which could sneak through with the support of a majority of Democrats and a rump faction of Republicans. In recent months, that’s been the model for passing big-ticket legislation, such as the New Year’s Day tax compromise to avert the fiscal cliff. Members of the Senate’s Gang of Eight are hoping that generating some 70 votes in the upper chamber will apply enough pressure that House Republicans will be forced to go along — or face a backlash at the ballot box.

But since even the House Republicans open to an immigration deal say they won’t rubberstamp the Senate’s measure, the path to the President’s desk is likely to be a laborious one. If the House passes its own legislation, each chamber would have to appoint members to a conference committee charged with hashing out the differences. Republicans would harp on concerns about the legislation’s cost, as well as inadequate border security and enforcement. Democrats would balk if the path to citizenship gets too onerous, and might decide they prefer to keep immigration as a political cudgel rather than pass a watered-down bill. As anyone who remembers the failure of the deficit-reduction “supercommittee” can tell you, there’s plenty of risk in these kinds of high-stakes, bicameral poker games.

At the moment, Boehner’s problem is he doesn’t yet have a hand to play. As the Senate’s Gang of Eight works to whip colleagues, the House negotiators charged with crafting their own bipartisan blueprint are struggling simply to agree on terms. Despite months of regular meetings, progress has been fitful. The eight-member group blew through a recent deadline Boehner imposed, and intermittent reports of a pact have proven premature. But despite “a few precipice points in the past few weeks,” a deal remains within reach, says a House Democratic aide close to the negotiations, who estimated that the agreement would come after the Senate bill hits the floor the week of June 10, but before its final passage. The pressure to get something done is acute for Republicans. Without a legislative vehicle to send to conference, they would be forced to swallow the Senate deal or get battered by immigration advocates for scuttling the best shot at comprehensive reform in a generation.

Aides say the outline emerging in the House is more conservative than the Senate version. It has a more onerous path to citizenship (15 years instead of the Senate’s 13), stiffer enforcement provisions and restrictions on the healthcare benefits immigrants can receive. The healthcare issue is the primary hurdle, according to a House Democratic aide, although the two parties are also split on a solution to the issue of guest workers — a major piece of the Senate’s measure.

The House could also pursue a piecemeal approach, divvying a sprawling bill into a few smaller chunks that are largely acceptable even to rock-ribbed conservatives. Virginia Republican Bob Goodlatte, the chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, has introduced measures to expand the eVerify and agricultural guest-worker programs. That legislation could then be used as a vehicle to conference with the Senate, who could tack on the citizenship provisions that are essential to Democrats.e

This array of uncertainties is why the bill’s smooth journey so far doesn’t have opponents of comprehensive immigration reform quaking. “It’s gone as expected,” says Ira Mehlman, a spokesman for the Federation For American Immigration Reform (FAIR), which advocates for reduced immigration levels and opposes the bill. The markup process in the Senate Judiciary Committee “was kind of kabuki theater,” he says. “The Gang of Eight tightly controlled all aspects of the debate.”

Immigration-reform advocates are heartened that a groundswell of opposition has yet to materialize among the conservative grassroots. There have been no raucous town halls during this week’s recess, no protests drawing widespread media coverage. A coalition of conservative leaders released a letter blasting the Senate bill as “bloated and unwieldy along the lines of Obamacare,” but most of the major conservative advocacy groups are supporting the effort or staying on the sidelines. Opponents concede that supporters have been disciplined and shrewd. When Reid said the passage in the Senate will be “pretty easy,” he may have been right.

But it is early yet. Controversies over the IRS, Benghazi and Department of Justice probes of reporters have overshadowed immigration so far. That is about to change. “We’re at the beginning stages here,” Mehlman says. “The real test is going to come as it hits the Senate floor.” And it gets tougher from there.

MORE: The Made-Up Numbers Dominating the Immigration Debate

33 comments
KennethGlennKoons
KennethGlennKoons

Schumer , Reid, and the rest of the Open Borders, allow all illegals no matter who in, is just a disaster. I love Rubio and the Pubs on that silly Gang of 8 but frankly, like Obama care, the Congress should have attacked both problems piece by piece,one issue at a time with their best solutions but they went for the whole enchillada  and we get.....chaos, confusion, and un-American principles flouted in our collective faces.

AmericanCynic
AmericanCynic

Time continues to shill for the open borders/amnesty crowd while ignoring the looming unemployment crisis that is going to confront the USA and practically every other industrial nation in a few decades, i.e., the displacement of labor, of all skill levels, but particulary the low and moderately skilled workers.  I am no expert in robotics, here are a few examples of my concerns:

We all saw pc's replaced typewriters, and the secretarial pool shrank or disappear in the late 1980s.  Then we saw US automobile factories introduced robotics and other high tech equipment into their factories back in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Do you remember the Ford commercials showing their factories where robots were assembling and painting Ford cars and trucks?  Anyone who has been to the grocery store has probably used the new self-service check-out counters, where six or nine or more terminals are overseen by one or two employees.  Most recently, there was an article in the technology section of "Real Clear Politics" discussing Phillips Electronics new factory in The Netherlands, which has uses a sophisticated robotic hand to assemble their electric shavers, which the article notes require incredibly intricate assembly processes.  This Dutch factory employes approximately 100 workers; in comtract, a Phillips factory in China, which does the same intricate and complicated assembly work uses 2,300 Chinese workers.  Martin Ford, a robotics expert, in his book, "The Lights in the Tunnel" explains how robotics, automation, and similar processes and equipment are going to create a massive shift from labor to machinery in the next several decades. 

What happens if this "comprehensive immigration bill" passes and 11.5+ million low skilled workers are legalized, then they are allowed under "family reunification" to sponsor their family members?   According to Rep. Pearce R-NM speaking on C-Span in April, in 1986, the 1986 amnesty legalized 3,000,000 individuals who then sponsored an average of five individuals each--15,000,000 people got citizenship.  What happens if these 11.5 million individuals do likewise and we have 65+ million new immigrants to the USA, many of whom are likely to be low skilled?  Where will the jobs be, given the trends in robotic, etc.--are we going to see unemployment in a couple of decades at 25% or 30% or more?  This is very likely even without this bill according to Martin Ford.  My fear is that this bill's passage is going to give us 35% or 40% unemployment mid-century--creating a economic crisis that will cause massive social unrest.  Instead of this immigration bill, what we really need, IMHO, is a focus on helping the existing US labor pool  and businesses to adapt to these high tech trends, i.e., providing more education and by seeking ways to reduce the labor inputs so that we don't need bring in workers now only to see them unemployed in a couple of decades later.

DaveFrancis
DaveFrancis

In at least one decisive aspect, from the Gang of Eight's immigration bill (S.477) that was passed out of the Judiciary Committee, left exactly the same way it went into the mark-up as it came in?There is literary little or NO enforcement that was demanded by the people, before 11 million illegal aliens begin to obtain their legal status and provisional work permits. It is Questionable of whether to put amnesty prior to enforcement or enforcement before amnesty was essential to the debate. The whole premise was the enforcement triggers that were the most urgent of the amendments, but rejected by the mostly Senate Democrats, with a small contingent of Republicans. The left laid it on real thick in retreating from the amendments that would make Americans safer and give them a fighting chance of competing with these new processed people.The problem is that the national press is misleading the public, because what we are seeing is a return to the 1986 Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA) with very little change when it comes to the enforcement mechanics? The Fence will more or less remain the same, with massive unenforceable areas, with nothing but a few barbed wire strands. More cameras, agents and equipment maybe, but NOT the double layer fencing that became law in 2006?

Not much has changed—although mandatory E-Verify will be enacted, the trouble with even that it will not be fully operational for 18 months, especially now U.S. citizens and lawful residents cannot find a job.The jobless rate for high-school graduates is higher now than it was in May 2007, as is the unemployment rate for college graduates. The employment-population ratio for high school graduates was nearly 60 percent in May 2007; it is now just over 54 percent.And the number of guest workers brought in by the G-8 bill could be much greater than 200,000 a year. Unemployment rate in the United States is 7.5 percent, or more than 12 million still looking for work. That’s not counting the ones who have given up looking for work. These are the people who should get priority, not people who violated the law to cross into America in the first place, then committed a felony by using another citizens/resident Social Security number to get a job or lied to the agent at the inboard airline arrivals. Do the math — 12 million Americans are out of work, so we will acquire 11 million illegal’s and make citizens of them. Isn’t that wonderful? Twelve million pink slipped American workers will then have to compete with 11 million former illegal aliens for any jobs that become available.

 

DaveFrancis
DaveFrancis

Then laws regarding welfare were rejected, that would halt the public assistance dam from spilling over and turning into a torrent.Then another controversial bombshell from the Heritage Foundation hit the headlines, that settling illegal aliens after being lawfully recognized would cost taxpayers $6.3 trillion dollars. This dollar figure is to support them over a 50 year period once legalized. The 11million population number is a controversy in itself, as that has been touring the newspapers for at least a decade, give or take a million. Then we have Guest worker demanded by agriculture and the agrarian community. Is this going to be another fraudulent game played by lawyers for their corporate benefactors, or middlemen bending the rules to produce another cheap labor pool? I just see any regulations by the labor department to ramp up vetting or a move to strict organized system, to approve work permits with the emphasis that there is no road to a path to citizenship for the guest worker and family. That the rules are clear that once your permit expires, you must return home or have it renewed; they cannot disappear from their farming job, meat packing or what Americans will not do, for poor wages and head for the big cities. As for STEM workers at the highest skill level who would like to immigrate, but all the rest should be selected from the thousands of highly intelligent Americans who have graduated with a PH.D.

EVENTUALLY I SEE A DESPERATE NEED AS MANY OTHER DEVELOPED NATIONS TO ISSUE EVERY BIRTHRIGHT OR NATURALIZED CITIZEN A BIOMETRIC NATIONAL IDENTIFICATION CARD. WE CAN ALL BE VICTIMS OF IDENTITY THEFT, BUT A FEDERAL ID CARD CAN SAVE YOU FROM BECOMING A CASUALTY?ONLY AUTHORIZED WORKERS CAN BE HIRED, EITHER WITH THIS LAMINATED NON-COUNTERFEIT CARD WITH YOUR FINGERPRINTS AND/OR STATE OF THE ART RETINAL SCAN.AMERICAN WORKERS WOULD NOT HAVE TO COMPETE WITH ILLEGAL WORKERS WITH STOLEN SECURITY NUMBERS. AS A FURTHER SECURITY PROBABILITY THE CARD WOULD ANNOUNCE YOU AS A CITIZEN WITH THE RIGHT TO VOTE.

THIS IS NOT LIKE WE HAVE NOW—WHICH IS AN INTENTIONAL CHAOS, PLAYED OUT BY THE LIBERALS AND OTHER TOXIC PARTIES, WHO DISPLAY A BLIND EYE TO ACTUALLY VOTES, INCLUDING IN A LARGE PROPORTIONS OF ILLEGAL ALIENS.A PERJURY WARNING ON THE VOTING APPLICATION MEANS NOTHING AS ILLEGAL ALIENS HAVE ALREADY BROKEN THE LAW TWICE, SO VOTING ILLEGALLY MEANS NOTHING TO THEM?THERE IS NO RESTRICTIONS AS A SERIOUS PUNISHMENT WHEN THEY VOTE, BUT A NATIONAL ID CARD WOULD MAKE IT IMPOSSIBLE FOR NON-CITIZENS TO VOTE? CAN WE EVEN HOPE TO CALCULATE THE NUMBER OF NON-CITIZENS WHO COMMITTED VOTER FRAUD IN THE PREVIOUS PRESIDENTIAL ELECTIONS? The further benefit would be to alleviate the mental pain of a criminal stealing your credit information and the years of rage and frustration to resolve this issue, that is still growing substantially?

DaveFrancis
DaveFrancis

That 11 million of illegal aliens includes the cost of putting all of them on national retirement programs, such as Social Security and Medicaid and Obama health care should it still exist? A further impact was a discussion this week hosted by the Bipartisan Policy Centerthat stated that under current law, American-born, adult children of illegal aliens can seek green cards for their parents and siblings in family chain migration. In the Heritage revision from the foundations previous study by its fellow researcher Robert Rector added that half of the current population of roughly 11 million illegal immigrants has U.S.-born child that could enroll parents in retirement programs, which cost taxpayers roughly $22,000 per retiree annually. Another amnesty would allow all illegal immigrants to sign up for retirement programs, and also to bring in millions of their relatives who could also sign up for the retirement programs. That is a vicious financial circle that could not be contained in Medicare and Medicaid for the poor, that is already running out of stream as Social Security. Rector said at the meeting, “If your interest is saving the American taxpayer trillions of dollars, close that loophole,” Rector adding “We should not grant amnesty and we should also close that loophole.” He further went on to say, “The 11 million illegal immigrants have an average education equivalent to the 10th grade. If amnestied, that in the May 6 Heritage Foundation report stated, that legalized immigrants they would be on track to received $9.3 trillion in benefits over the next 50 years, and pay ONLY $3 trillion in taxes — just like the corresponding unskilled Americans labor?

Then we have our own share of people or rather “Freeloaders” who are the leeches in our society. Admittedly it’s a bad time for millions of jobless American, but there is a good half of our own citizens/residents who run and hide, if ”work” turns up in their vocabulary. In the daily comments I read every day, there are illustrations of methods illegal aliens and American go to thwarting the welfare system and entitlements. Food stamps are especially vulnerable to the criminal element

ACTION: We must Stop Amnesty Now. Congress is in this flat-out race with each party to eliminate border security. Behind closed doors right now the "Gang of 8” is creating a plan to give millions of illegal aliens free citizenship. We need you to help us conduct a full frontal attack on every member of Congress by contacting the main switchboard toll-free--1-888-978-3094--?As TAXPAYERS we must send urgent and personalized free Fax bombardment messages to ALL 100 U.S. Senators AND ALL 435 U.S. Representatives at their DC offices by going on NumbersUSA website. There is also access to petitions to let your representatives know what you are thinking. You can even learn to a much greater extent, daily antics at the border in the selected rural and national press, that Washington prefers to keep away from your eyes. American Patrol is the place to go for storage of news reports from across the country. Then Judicial Watch the latest fillings relating to political corruption in state and federal government agencies, with emphasis on the illegal alien invasion. REMEMBER YOU CAN ALSO SUFFOCATE THE SOCIAL NETWORKS, LOCAL TV SHOWS AND ANYWHERE YOU CAN VOICE YOUR OPINION, TO SAVE AMERICA FROM ANOTHER OBAMA DEFICIT THAT HASN’T STOP RISING WITH THE IMPLEMENTATION OF AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, AND NOW FREEDOM FOR PEOPLE WHO HAVE VICTIMIZED AMERICANS; STEALING THEIR JOBS AND CRIMINAL ACTIVITIES THAT IS NOT PUBLICIZED BY THE PRESS OR THE LEFT.


ReneDemonteverde
ReneDemonteverde

Should border security be priority first ? It is like putting the cart before the horse. We already have an amnesty program under Reagan and it has not stopped anything. The GOP members of the gang of eight knows the reason why Democrats want immigration reform is they wan to increase their base. Suckers.


jmac
jmac

House Republicans will push "restrictions on health care benefits immigrants can receive."   Of course they will.   That way businesses have even more of an incentive to hire the immigrant over the American covered by health care.

Those Republicans - they know how to play the game, and they know how to get 'wigglwagon' to vote for them.   It's too bad they can never look at the big picture.      Better learn Spanish - you're going to need it.    

wigglwagon
wigglwagon

Why does Harry Reid hate American workers?  Why would he think America needs more workers of any kind?  Does he know that there are nearly 30 million Americans looking for work right now?  Does he even have a clue how supply and demand works?  It is abundantly clear that he knows NOTHING about the history of the Great Depression.  


That is exactly where we are headed again if he and the Democratic Party continue helping business use immigration to drive down wages and destroy benefits for law abiding workers.

Uglyamerican
Uglyamerican

The last major immigration reform in 1986 did a great deal for the illegal aliens who took the deal. It did almost nothing good for Americans. This bill promises to again do much for a much larger group of foreigners and nothing for Americans.

The last amnesty was for 1.5 million people and about 3.2 million actually applied. This one is purportedly for 11.7 million, but we could expect how many...30 million? The "Net-Zero" migration at the border went out the window as rumor of an amnesty spread South of the Border. Apprehensions by the CBP are up 500%. These people won't qualify but many will settle here and wait for the next amnesty. How many will that be for? 40 million? Rewarding criminal behavior only begets more criminal behavior. In this case, much more. It has to stop! If there is a reward for ignoring laws, they will come in ever increasing numbers. The US cannot absorb all Latin Americans who think they want a better life. This amnesty needs to fail in a huge way for the sake of the USA.

nalaa
nalaa

This bill isn't about the dreamers or even legalization of the 11 million, they could be considered a red herring. This bill is more about massive expansion of future legal immigration by flooding the already tight labor market of BOTH low and high-skilled foreign workers, sponsored by the billion dollar corporate open borders lobby. Just look to the Super PAC's and their sponsors. Someone, anyone, tell me why you think this is a good thing? Knee-jerk, reactionary partisanship is rampant and something that has worked to this "reform's"favor. Read the bill.

CharlesEdwardBrown
CharlesEdwardBrown

NO AMNESTY and NO LEGALIZATION of illegal aliens. We need the Federal Government to start doing their job and enforce immigration laws. Deport all illegal aliens.

outsider
outsider

Typical republican position; if it benefits someone else, instead of them - they're against it. 

Paul,nnto
Paul,nnto

As ever, the weakest Speaker in this country's history can't heard his cats. This is going nowhere. 

deconstructiva
deconstructiva

Thanks, Alex. I don't expect the House Tea Party to produce anything meaningful on immigration (or jobs, or...). John Boehner is not exactly a profile in courage. Where's Bob Dole when the R's need him? Why the mainstream GOP chooses to let the TP run the show and wait for Latino demographics to catch up and vote them out is a mystery. Once Texas turns blue from that, the game is over for them. The mainstreamers need to draw the TP's back in line or kick them out, even at risk of losing power while they rebuild their moderate base. The TP's have powerful allies in the Koch brothers, but there are many more corporate wallets on Wall Street and the S&P 500 to fill the GOP void if the TP's are forced out to live their remaining days as gun-toting doomsday preppers in the hills and plains.

That aside, I write the above knowing full well the R's won't do any of this, so this is all good for the more inclusive D's. Even if too many D's in Congress are a little too cozy with biz interests, the R's are stuck with a Sophie's Choice with immigration: which base to (tick) off, the TP racists now or the Latinos that will turn Texas blue later?

Whatanotion
Whatanotion

Essentially this is the soft slavery bill.  Just as Kenneth L. Stamp's  Peculiar Institution explained about how some whites were against slavery because they lost jobs thereby; this is yet another capitalist bite at the slavery apple.    The reason robots haven't made it to the sales floor yet is that robots don't buy real estate or medical insurance or pay rent.  These are robots that replicate themselves and pay rent.  This will perpetuate the "Company Store" economy and in fact tend to expand it.  The bankers and landlords are loving it.  Used car dealers are doing very well because of immigrants.  Everyone else can eat cake.

LanceSjogren
LanceSjogren

@jmac 

Just as long as you don't use the misdeeds of Republicans to sweep the atrocities of Democrats like Schumer under the rug.

ReneDemonteverde
ReneDemonteverde

@jmac Right learn Spanish. After Spanish, Chinese. After Chinese, Arabic and study the koran too. So on and on.

LanceSjogren
LanceSjogren

@wigglwagon 


Harry Reid doesn't hate American workers, he simply is stupid, cowardly, and lacks basic arithmetic skills.

jmac
jmac

@wigglwagon  If you honestly think that it's Democrats who want immigrants here to do our dirty work, then you deserve the Republican party you get.   It is the Republican Chamber of Commerce that pushes immigrants so businesses don't have to pay American workers a decent wage.  It's Republican who yell about the union worker who wants the decent wage.    It is Democrats that say if immigrants are here and being used, they must be treated fairly. 

It's amazing how the Republican party can continue to hookwink the American voter.  You have only yourself to blame.   

bryanfred1
bryanfred1

1.  No matter how badly you might want to, there is no practical way to identify, locate and deport 11.7 million people (and likely more).  I doubt that even the most ardent opponent of comprehensive reform has the stomach to see the Elian Gonzales scene played out hundreds of thousands of times across the country.  Not to mention the about a third of illegal immigrants are from points south of Mexico, so it's not as if we can just drop them off at the Tijuana border crossing; we'd be shipping millions of people all over Latin and South America.  Insisting that we just throw out everyone who is here illegally is howling at the moon.  Can't be done, which means we have to find some way to deal with them here.

2.  That also means serious border security otherwise it's exactly what you describe - 1986 all over again.  So border fences, electronic monitoring, agents and an end to sanctuary cities.  It also means applicants must be employed, eligibility for government benefits modest, and going to the end of the line behind all existing legal applicants.  Otherwise we're not admitting productive members of society; we're giving financial asylum to people unfortunate enough to be born in poorer countries and the U.S. does not have enough room or resources for everyone in the world facing those circumstances.

This is a deal both Republicans and Democrats will hate, which means it's probably about as fair as it gets.

wigglwagon
wigglwagon

@nalaa

People like the DREAMERS are not needed in America. The people in their home countries need the DREAMERS to help build free, prosperous societies. It is America's responsibility to help all countries build a better world. We should not be stealing 'the best and the brightest' from other countries.

LanceSjogren
LanceSjogren

@outsider2011 


Ironically, the "immigration reform" promoted by the left only benefits one group- the very wealthy.


Progressives are unwitting dupes of the sweatshop lobby and are utterly clueless about it.  


I found it comical that "occupy" demonstrators held an event a couple years back in this area for "immigrant rights".  That is precisely the immigration agenda of wall street banksters.  The irony is lost on these half-wit leftists.

bryanfred1
bryanfred1

A flood of low-income workers benefits the lower and middle classes how, exactly?  Democrats are shooting their own constituents in the foot.  Unemployment among black youths is north of 40% - think increasing the supply of unskilled labor helps or hurts that situation?

outsider
outsider

@Paul,nnto 


He really is pathetic. I laughed at his, i'm hanging back approach. That isn't leadership; that's failure to lead. 


Doubly ironic when you consider that is what he (and the right wing) accuses the President of being. 

LanceSjogren
LanceSjogren

@deconstructiva 


So all you care about is what are the political implications for the major parties and you do not care one whit what the actual consequences of so-called immigration reform would be for the well-being of the American people?

wigglwagon
wigglwagon

@jmac @wigglwagon

Everything I read or see in the Media says that this is a partisan issue and that Democrats are pushing for legalization of many millions of workers.  Are you saying that is not true???


You say, " It is Democrats that say if immigrants are here and being used, they must be treated fairly."


It is Democrats who say we should not enforce the law as it was written.   President Obama, the de facto leader of the Democrat Party, is the one who uses "discretion and deferrals" to undermine the laws that were written and enacted to protect American workers from unfair competition with the illegal workers.  Do you have even the vaguest idea of how 'supply and demand' works?  Or, do you not care how it works?  




LanceSjogren
LanceSjogren

@bryanfred1 


Your comments are reasonable, I just hope you recognize that the rational immigration policy you outline is the diametric opposite of what is in the so-called immigration reform bill proposed in the Senate.

LanceSjogren
LanceSjogren

@wigglwagon @nalaa 


You know, it's funny how open-borders people have no respect for the argument that one reason immigration restriction is needed is to ensure our national sovereignty, and yet they then turn around and say we need to siphon all the smart people from other countries of the world to work in this country- sounds a bit nationalistic does it not?  If there's an Einstein in India doesn't mankind benefit just as much if he or she advances human civilization in his or her home country rather than the US, and doesn't a country like India need the economic boost that it's smartest young people can provide more than the US does?

bryanfred1
bryanfred1

Problem is, the countries most of these people came from don't lack for resources or labor.  Their economic conditions are the result of poor governance, typically with some president-for-life Chavez type at the top.  It's possible that can be changed politically but I'm not holding my breath.  It's also hard for people who have seen life in the U.S. to go back to a country where the standard of living is a fraction of what they're used to here.

jmac
jmac

@wigglwagon @jmac "Supply and demand".   You want to supply workers to pick up the trash after a big Texas football game?  You want someone to wash your dishes in a restaurant?       Either learn Spanish or call your local Republican Chamber of Commerce.   They're in control.  

wigglwagon
wigglwagon

@jmac @wigglwagon

The Democratic Party spent 50 years fighting to protect American workers from the insatiable greed of employers.  During that time, America built the biggest and most prosperous economy the world has ever seen.  Why did the Democratic Party do an about face and spend the next 30 years in lockstep with Republicans helping employers use illegal immigration, free trade, and deregulation to drive down wages which also drives down consumer demand.  Until we return to protecting our workers from the insatiable greed of employers, there will be no return to prosperity for America.



You are the one being hoodwinked by partisan politics.  There are millions of us lifelong Democrats who will never vote Democrat again because of the Democratic support for stupid trade and irrational immigration.