The Lesson of the Bush Family E-Mail Hack: Be Worried

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BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI / AFP / Getty Images

Former U.S. Presidents George W. Bush and George H.W. Bush are shown on screens at the Tampa Bay "Times" forum during the Republican National Convention in Tampa on Aug. 29, 2012

When was the last time you sent an e-mail you wouldn’t want to see posted on the Smoking Gun? A message about your finances? A complaint about the way that friend was behaving last night? A sweet nothing to a new someone? An angry rant about … well, you get the point. It hasn’t been long. Most people do this every week, if not every day, and not because they are conniving. Some things should just be private. Now the Bush family — the one with two living Presidents and lifetime Secret Service protection — has a message for you: be worried.

(PHOTOS: Presidents in Profile: 20 Portraits from the White House Archives)

A hacker by the name of Guccifer has apparently hacked into several Bush family AOL accounts, pilfered private photos and messages and posted them online. The Smoking Gun, pursuant to their mission, republished it all. The stolen goods include a private letter from George W. Bush to his family about planning the funeral of his father. They include private correspondence from the Fox News journalist Brit Hume on the “silver linings” in the 2012 election. They include a Jeb Bush e-mail about how George H.W. Bush “helped restore” Bill Clinton’s “sordid reputation.” There is more. You can read about it off site. You can also look at the PG-rated pictures that George W. Bush apparently painted of himself bathing.

There is a criminal investigation. This guy may get caught, just like the guy who hacked Scarlett Johansson’s cell phone got caught. But that will be little consolation. (And it was little consolation to all those members of Congress in recent years who found their private R-rated photos trending on Google.) The fact is that the digital age makes us all unduly vulnerable. As Katy Steinmetz recently wrote for TIME, your digital records will outlive you and may cause your family problems. The permanence of online utterances — a delight to prosecutors, Facebook and snoops — is a bane for the rest of us.

(MORE: Resurrecting W.: Why George Bush Still Matters in 2012)

Which is why you should channel the titillation you feel right now at the chance to see a painting of a former President in the bath, and take some time to read Businessweek’s new cover story about Snapchat, the not-so-new online social network that is based around photos that self-destruct 10 seconds after you look at them. It’s not a complete solution, but it is the beginning of one. Technology has created an enormous burden on all of us. Over time, more companies will move into this space, selling not just a way for us to connect to one another — a technology that long ago left novelty and became a commodity — but a way for us to better protect our connections by eliminating their trail. (Facebook already has a Snapchat mimic called Poke.) There is no good reason that e-mails you wrote three years ago should be so hard to delete or still be living on the servers of your friends’ e-mail clients. There is no good reason that you still don’t understand your Facebook privacy settings. There is a market out there for improvement.

LIST: Top 10 Regrettable E-Mails

MORE: Study: 10,000 Identity Theft Rings in U.S

193 comments
kathy
kathy

I suppose every once in a while I send an email I wouldn't want the world to see, but I'm very careful not to.  I rarely make comments here or anywhere else I wouldn't not want associated with my name.  Civility counts.  I do not belong to Facebook.  

Even so, that does not leave me immune to having my life hacked, as others put information about me and pictures of me on <i>their</i> Facebook pages.  Still, you have to start somewhere.  Interesting and useful article about helping maintain some privacy on Facebook in the NYT today.  And Modo had an interesting extension of the Bush hack to  consider what will happen when drones, etc. are hacked.

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/07/technology/personaltech/protecting-your-privacy-on-the-new-facebook.html?src=me&ref=general

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/10/opinion/sunday/dowd-im-begging-dont-hack-the-hacks.html?hp&_r=0


drdlrmd
drdlrmd

I quit facebook over 1.5 yrs ago after discovering how it is being utilized by corporations, sociopaths, government , government companies, or other dumpster divers,  or those hired by government to mine data of people. Having been a part of and creating virtual communities since the early 90's it was a decision not made rashly or without some thought. 

And then when i witnessed a therapist friend of mine spending hours/day playing a game about building a farm and acquiring farm animals virtually, planting virtual crop, i knew that the internet had really changed from what it was and that i didn't belong in that reality.

Now.....who said they had some sheep for sale.

after all i'm from kansas where men are men and sheep are scared.


DeweySayenoff
DeweySayenoff

While everyone is heaping scorn on the hackers of the world, the fact is MOST people don't even bother locking the doors to their digital diaries.

Almost no one out there uses unique passwords for every site.  Almost no one out there bothers with complex passwords.  Yes, there ARE exceptions to that, but you who do lock things down are the minuscule minority.  Most people think they don't have anything "important" that could get stolen.  They're all wrong, of course, but when dealing with that kind of attitude, it just follows that next week, month, year, eventually, they're going to get hacked and get hacked off about it.

I can't say about the Bush's password complexity or uniqueness.  It could also be poor security on the part of the records holders - the e-mail service they access (They're still using AOL?  Really?). But security always starts at home.  Complicated passwords aren't hard to create OR memorize, IF you give it some thought before hand.

Web security is relatively simple if you use a consistent process for creating a password that's unique to the website.  Take any four digit number - part of your zip code, your phone number, your day and month of birth - but make it something you'll remember.  Take any four or five character word.  Your pet's name, perhaps.  Take any symbol (A !, #, $, %, ^, &, *, (, ?, ., or even a ,) or even two of them.  Just remember what they are.  Finally, take the first or last three or four characters of the website (or even the middle few), but just remember what part of it you use.

Then put them together in any order you remember.  Throw in capitals (how about capitalizing the name of the website?  Or that four or five letter word you're using).  And now you have a password that's unique to that website.

Say you're a subscriber to Time.  You could have a FIDO*time&0956 password that would be a 14 character, easy to remember, HIGH SECURITY password that would take years to crack.  Mix and match howsoever you want.  It could be FiDoTIme09*56&, or any variation on that theme, as long as YOU remember how you put it together.  By using part of the website as part of the password, you create a unique, hard to crack but easy to remember password for every website.

A friend of mine turned me on to this process a long time ago and I've passed it on to others whenever the opportunity arose.  You don't need to limit the number of characters, but should probably keep it somewhat shorter than the condensed version of War and Peace.  12-16 characters is generally "good enough" to make it next to impossible to crack your password - assuming, of course, you don't let anyone in on the exact process you use to make them.

One last thing: CHANGE YOUR PASSWORDS EVERY YEAR.  All that means is a new process to memorize and a few hours of updating passwords (for those of us with hundreds of passwords out there).  Security databases (the things that store your password on a website) are hacked quite often, meaning your password (and process if it's obvious enough) can be exposed.  A lot of places don't bother telling you they've been hacked, either, so you may not know your passwords were stolen until months or years later.  By changing it every year (or more often if you're paranoid), you at least cut off that avenue of exposure.  Yes, it's a hassle, but as I said (and was told), security starts at HOME.

Lock the damn digital door on YOUR side.  At least then if you get hacked, you can be pretty certain it was the OTHER guy who dropped the ball.

komponist53
komponist53

Point is, no recent president cares to interpret the Constitution in its fullness (including Obama), so whatever the Congress and President decide to do apart from the Constitution is fair game, so goes the modern attitude. And the spying continues and has deepened under the present administration.

DavidAsleep
DavidAsleep

I really find such violation of people's privacy disturbing . But giving the way the digital world goes these days. . .I guess that the chance you take every time you go on line. Having said that that. . . and artist paint themselves in the nude all the time not to mention other things that go beyond that. And big deal. . .so what!  He showed his legs. . .in the bathtub. . .OOOOh, My god! Lol.  Grow up! Lol. Anyway, as an artist I actual found some of the President's art to be very fascinating. . .I hadn't excepted to find such introspection.   . .almost lonely. 

coldmanfive
coldmanfive

The government's been spying on us and illegally stealing our information for years, so now I guess we're even.

sacredh
sacredh

I'm glad the hackers had the decency not to publish the nude oil George did of his mother.

goldhoarder
goldhoarder

Who stinking cares. Mr Patriot Act is worried about privacy. Screw the Bush family.

larryb
larryb

The fact is that people will not take the time, or make the effort, to protect themselves.  Secure/encrypted email was created years and years ago, and no one would use it...so it never became common.  Encryption for files is extremely simple...but few use it.  People then act surprised that "things got stolen".  The article is right...digital things live on for a long time.  But that doesn't mean they need be accessible.  Get smart, people.

guest123
guest123

Email is public because that is the value we place on it. The information you put in a paper envelope can be the same as the information you put in an email. So because the medium is different, does that mean snooping and stealing  isn't a crime? If someone steals the mail from my postbox, it is a federal offense.  If I have sent information to a specific person/address, how is hacking into my system and stealing my information any less offensive?  The argument is about intellectual control by the individual.  And until that information is sent by the individual originator to a public entity, only then does it come into the public domain.  We are taling about intellectual control and property rights.  And there is a difference between public information as designated by the originator, and the personal information an individual has a right to maintain.

Adam_Smith
Adam_Smith

Q: "When was the last time you sent an email you wouldn’t want to see posted on The Smoking Gun? A message about your finances?"

A: "It hasn’t been long. Most people do this every week, if not every day,"

How is this known about "most people"? I personally cannot remember ever sending such an email. Am I that exceptional? Maybe. I have no facebook or twitter accounts and do not want any. However, it isn't that I have no online presence. I have a blog and post frequently to various news and opinion sites. I have LiveFyre and Disqus accounts. Perhaps I have been simply early to see how problematic and time wasting these newer networking tools could be. I recently read that facebook members have started taking long breaks from facebook. Could it be that a trend away from facebook, and other social networking, has begun?

DonTurnbull
DonTurnbull

The simple fact of an online presence is that it is public.   Facebook, twitter, email, chat, all of it is public.  People often feel that one is talking quietly between friends, family, lovers when, in fact, one is effectively screaming in a bar.

Every time an email is sent, an instant message is sent,a post is put to Facebook, or whatever, that message is broken into small portions, copied across tens, even hundreds of devices (servers, routers, switches, etc..), and reassembled at it's destination.   In most cases (Facebook and other social sites), that destination is a large group of computers owned by someone who isn't part of the conversation where it sits.   Employess of that someone copy your message to backups and redundant systems in an effort to make sure you never loose access to it.  those copies live far longer than your access to the message itself because deleting your messages doesn't strip it off the backup.

During transmission, your information can be copied and reassembled by just about anyone.   With enough compute horsepower (easily accomplished by building a bot net by taking over the PCs of fools who respond to Nigerian princes or click the Clean Now button on unsolicited warnings of viruses), even most encryption can eventually be foiled but few bother with encryption.  The same people who don't even know about encryption are those surprised when their expensive property disapears from an unlocked car at a mall.

Finally, site security is only a little research away from being pointless.   Find out a username, learn the birthdays, hometowns, names, and maiden names of those close to the user, and you have access to bank information, email, and whatever else.

Even Snapshat which IS a step in the right direction (unless we're talking about teenage sexting) is someone else's computer managed by people you've never met and never will meet.  Don't believe for a second that your "destroyed" photo can't be captured and pop back up at the worst possible time.

In short, never, NEVER write anything online that you wouldn't say to anyone if you had too.  Never post a picture that you wouldn't share with anyone if you had too. Encrypt what you can and never actually put your mother's maiden name as an answer to a "security" question.  Always assume that everything you put into your computer (even if you do it sitting quietly in your home in your underwear all alone) is open to a stranger that you'll never meet who may not have your best interests in mind.

If you have something you REALLY want kept private, print it, put it in an envelope, and mail it.

gorskette
gorskette

There is no reason you should not undersand your Facebook privacy settings - other than the fact that Facebook clearly does not want you to.  If they did they would not change them on an almost daily basis and make it so hard to remove an account.

Employers asking for passwords to online accounts in interviews does nothing to ameliorate the situation. 

TheWidowssSon
TheWidowssSon

Bush is the one that started warrant less wiretapping of Americans. I don't care if he got hacked. He should know how it feels now that people looked at his private stuff online. It came back on him, that's what he gets. So be it!

mavis
mavis

I know that seeing these emails and personal photos of the Bush family is tittilating to most of us. And I've no doubt that Guccifer will be identified and prosecuted just as Scarlett Johansen's hacker was.

But unfortunately, those of us who have no national or international recognition and have our accounts hacked and personal information shared with others or who are stalked and hacked and harrassed don't mean squat to authorities. And the harm that these hacks can do can strike much more deeply than any painting of George Bush's feet in the bathtub.

Having been hacked and reporting it to the police was an utter debacle. I had to actually lead the detective who was supposed to be the computer expert through all my emails that were posted on the hacker's computer. And even then, with proof right in front of them, they did nothing. They did worse than nothing... they actively ignored my follow up messages and pleas for action.

You may surmise that this was some sort of lovers' quarrel or flame war but it was not. It was active harrassment, libel, and slander performed by a convicted stalker who was mentally ill and quite frankly they didn't know what to do about him.

Yes, I agree. Be worried. I never thought that something like this could happen to me. But it did. And I still suffer the consequences of his actions.

cwiz
cwiz

omg hackers are skurry!!!1!

guest123
guest123

@DeweySayenoff    There was a time when we didn't have to lock our doors, period.  Imagine.  People who were honest and honorable.  Imagine.  And did you know, that there are still communities around the world where locking your front door is not necessary?  It's a much better life than the one you are living.

Ajax
Ajax

@DeweySayenoff Excellent primer my friend.  Your offering should be mandatory education. While many jaded geeks will think why bother to tell people how to do it correctly, I applaud you as I would any concerned and highly qualified teacher. I think you must be a fine person. I would like to add something as well. If you are not using your wireless function........turn it off. If you are, change the modem system password and wireless network key and SSID if possible or if allowed. They are the easiest to hack due to the fact that they are usually a series of factory issued numbers and/or common unit names as provided by the various ISP's. That information may be unclear to the untechnically inclined, so feel free to describe it in depth to them if you wish.

traffikator
traffikator

@DeweySayenoff  You are making some good points but, "as long as YOU remember how you put it together." is the difficult part. It is the memory that fails most of us. Using a password management software or a two factor authentication, maybe the way to go an you will only need to memorize the one complex master password. But more to the point, using a passphrase is far more secure, but many websites have a limit on the number and characters you can use and that is a major limitation. How easily can a hacker crack this one: ! $l33p w3ll @ night. You know this is a sentence that cannot be cracked by an software out there because of the completely non-dictionary nature, but at also the spaces. It is a sentence you can remember, but alas most sites will not allow you to add that level of complexity to your password. 

Paul,nnto
Paul,nnto

@sacredh Agreed- No one needs to see a picture of George Washington in the buff.

DeweySayenoff
DeweySayenoff

@Adam_Smith Perhaps, Mr. Smith, you have forgotten the meaning of the word "Most".  That means more than half.  It's fairly self evident that you are not among the majority.  I know a lot of people who would not want their e-mail exposed for the world to see, although for me, my biggest concern would be for breached privacy of those who corresponded with ME, rather than what I said to THEM.

So, you see, your perspective is entirely self-centered and skewed from the norm.  Hence the observation of my first sentence.

You do what a lot of people do: Equate your life as being "normal" and your habits the same as the habits of everyone else.  Then you question the habits of the majority based on your own, single, unique experience without any apparent regard for the others who may have corresponded their private thoughts to you nor did you indicated you even bothered to ask others about their e-mail content habits.  And yet, you seem to be assuming that what you do is what everyone else does.  

If you want to find out what everyone else does, Google it.  That information IS out there.

The Bush's AOL account was hacked - not their Facebook account or Twitter. And by your inappropriately applied "it doesn't apply to me" attitude, I'd guess that your passwords are no more secure or unique or changed as often as most people's are since it wasn't social networking that brought the Bush's down, but very likely a password that wasn't strong enough or unique to AOL or one that had been around for years.

You do not live in isolation in a networked world, Mr. Smith.  Not having a Facebook account or Twitter doesn't mean you're secure. You may think you're taking the right steps to be secure, but even the most attentive individual occasionally forgets to lock a door the right way.


traffikator
traffikator

@DonTurnbull You have made some really great points that many people do not take into consideration. Encryption is the way to go to minimize the dangers. But two of your statements while true are unrealistic. "If you have something you REALLY want kept private, print it, put it in an envelope, and mail it" _ There is no guarantee it will get to the person and your mail can be easily read by anyone who is in the path of delivery.  And not only that, the government has the right to intercept your mail. 

"In short, never, NEVER write anything online that you wouldn't say to anyone if you had too." Well??? So all the Government correspondence that Bradley Manning released should not have been written, right? You see security is a tiered concept which involves trust. Any of the trusted entities can be a weak point in that link. Not you say you did not make some salient points, but ...

guest123
guest123

@DonTurnbull  Email is public because that is the value we place on it.  The information you put in a paper envelope can be the same as the information you put in an email.  So because the medium is different, does that mean snooping isn't a crime?  If someone steals the mail from my postbox, it is a federal offense.  How is hacking into my system and stealing my information any less offensive?

WilfTarquin
WilfTarquin

@gorskette Create multiple facebook accounts. You could for instance have one squeaky clean one under your real name for employers and similar; one throwaway one under a completely made up name for use on, say, online fora; and a real one under a nickname for your closest friends. And never, ever, link them to each other in any way.

guest123
guest123

@gorskette   Facebook is just another cheap snooping mechanism on the internet.

TheRef
TheRef

Actually both Lincoln and Roosevelt did far worse than Bush. They did things like suspending habeus corpus, interning American citizens without trial and jailing people who disagreed with them. Let's hope your boy Obama targets you for one of his remote control murders with no arrest, lawyer or trial. With your attitude it wouldn't bother me one bit.

TheRef
TheRef

@TheWidowssSon Let's hope your boy Obama targets you for remote control murder with no arrest, Miranda rights or trial. I won't care what happens to someone with your attitude.

pushingdog
pushingdog

@TheWidowssSon.. Absolutely!! The Bush era intruded on individual citizens' privacy, under the guise of "national security" more than any other administration in the history of the USA so tough titty says the kitty.  Besides what kind of idiot sends emails with sensitive material unencrypted and then retains a copy...or right its the Bush Family.

guest123
guest123

@TheWidowssSon   Please grow up and stop with the "blame Bush for everying" propaganda.  Snooping and spying in politics is as old as dirt.  Domestically and internationally.  Today and in ancient times.  Get a clue.  Read a book. 

komponist53
komponist53

@TheWidowssSon  

Bush didn't start that snglehandedly, you know. He had approval of the Senate, and do you remember the circumstances behind it?

traffikator
traffikator

@mavis I share your cynicism and anger. To make matters worse, if you dropped a trojan on the hackers machine that did untold "interesting things", then you would be charged with a crime. It is a bad state. 

sacredh
sacredh

I thought it was a little strange that George likes to paint himself nude. I used to paint and draw quite a bit. I never painted or drew myself in any setting.

traffikator
traffikator

@guest123 @DonTurnbull Email is PUBLIC??? Okay then. I see. From the perspective of other people, they do not consider it public. It is a supposed to be a secure service offered. That is why you create and manage your own password and you can do things like encryption. If you happen to leave your house door open or you did not arm your car alarm, are the things in your car or house public for any to use and access? The rest of your comment does not justify the first sentence. Maybe a typo?

DeweySayenoff
DeweySayenoff

@guest123 @DonTurnbull E-mail is NOT "public", folks.  No more than your own U.S. postal mail is.  Be it a hard copy or an electronic one, there IS an "envelope" for both and every e-mail server requires a unique username and a password.  

Those two little things make what you do with them private.

But just like the letter you mail to your Aunt Debbie discussing what to do about your Dad's senility, both e-mail and posted mail can be intercepted.  They travel on public "highways" to get to where they're intended to go.  To open the envelope, the person on the other end needs to have entered a user name and password (both of which are often stored in the program they use to access it for their convenience) .

Paranoia can only take you so far.  Life is not without risk and can not be made to be without risk.  In a networked world, your online privacy depends not only on YOU, but on everyone else as well.  Based on that, we're all screwed because not everyone else is going to be as diligent as we are.  So while YOU may not be writing about your sausage fetish (or whatever it is that you don't want the world to know about you) someone you spoke about it with may have put it in an e-mail to someone else and THEY will "out" you.  So unless you want to live in a sealed cave with your lips sewn shut (just in case someone's listening because you never know, right?), it would be better to just be prepared for the worst while hoping for the best and get on with life.

MiscAdverts
MiscAdverts

@WilfTarquin @gorskette Except that recently, after doing this, I noticed that for some reason I have not figured out, I was given a list of possible friends to consider. This list also contained the names of people I was only acquainted with years ago with our only correspondence outside face to face discussions in the project we did jointly was by email. I had not, since the ending of the project, searched for them or anything else that might have put a cookie of any kind in my New Computer. OK, what is that all about? I googled the situation (of why I would even get friend suggestions in a new account and especially for people I had no contact with) and found a couple of discussions about this same event. Some of the suggestions were that somehow facebook was able to tap into our email systems and gather the email names of those people we had contact with. And, if those people  had a facebook account, they were suggested to us as possible facebook friends.  Also, a person I didn't know  who had written to me on my old facebook account asking to become a friend, which request I rejected, was also suggested to me as a facebook friend (along with all his facebook friends). 

I expect that we will eventually find out what is really going on with facebook (in particular). There will be big lawsuits about invasion of privacy etc. They will pay a small fine.  However, this will take a long while and meantime .... the bottom line is you are not really protected in any way from having what ever is put up about you or by you protect from prying eyes. 

pushingdog
pushingdog

@guest123 Well who started 2 wars they could not win?

Who let the banking sector destroy the housing sector?

Who ruined the image of America on the world stage?

Who ran up a deficit that we are all stuck with now after Clinton left him a surplus?

Who let America be attacked on its own soil  for the first time since Pearl Harbour?

Does that sound like Propaganda? Sounds like facts to me. But of course Republicans rarely deal with facts...other than to cover them up.

YommiMitaru
YommiMitaru

@guest123 Other things from "ancient times":

Lawlessness

Murder

Rape

Pillaging

Incurable disease

Short lifespans

...

Other things common in "politics" of say Russia, poisoning, murdering, thieving, corruption on a grand scale...

Anywho, have fun in your dream world while it lasts, the alarm is about go off and you're not going to like waking up.

komponist53
komponist53

@guest123  

20 years from now, these same anti-Bushites will be railing against Bush, comparing him to Hitler and Stalin, having no clue at all. 

cwiz
cwiz

@guest123
Malicious black hat hackers can be, but not always.  But none of them are "scum".  I was mocking this article.  People are just intimidated by what they don't understand.  Anyone who wants privacy will make sure they're protected by a responsible provider.  And providers should strive to protect their users' data.  Don't label a group of people because of the actions of one person.

WilfTarquin
WilfTarquin

@MiscAdverts @WilfTarquin @gorskette Yes you must keep your acccounts completely separate, with no or at least very little overlap, or they'll link them. Facebook, Google, Yahoo, Disqus and others do analyse your emails, and whom you friend,  and even the content of your posts on places like this, in order to identify you and "connect you to your friends and interests" (target you with ads).

traffikator
traffikator

@guest123 @pushingdog Why do you say mindlessly bashing Bush? Bush was responsible for the deaths of hundreds of thousands of innocent Iraqis and Afghans. The crash of our economy and all the things mentioned. So 100,000 years from now, it will go away and he will bear no responsibility just as Hiroshima and the Holocaust and 9/11 never happened and those responsible are no longer to be blamed as time passes. Your line of reasoning only makes sense to you and Rush Limbaugh and FOX.

robmccallr@yahoo.com
robmccallr@yahoo.com

@guest123 @pushingdog I don't think that his point is about simple corruption. He is talking about historic failure of policies and actions at the presidential level. Very different than pointing out corruption from a politician, even if a presidential one. 

Bush and Cheney governed in a way that produced and demonstrated historic policy and action failure that was and remain the cause of our lost decade and more of economic, social, political, and international prosperity for the average American. This occurred based on policies and actions of a political party and president that continue to this day in congressional subterfuge and sabotage. History will bear his out for sure.

But to be fair, on the very narrow issue of the loss of privacy and government surveillance,  Mr Bush or republican leaders of Federal government were no pioneers or the last of the culprits. 

guest123
guest123

@pushingdog @guest123 Glad to see that you conceed that hacking is nasty.  Wish you could see the corruption on both sides of the aisle. But then you wouldn't have any fun mindlessly bashing Republicans.

guest123
guest123

@YommiMitaru @guest123   Not dream, but reality.  Positive against negative.  The eternal struggle.  And always there will be ordinary people who will stand up to despots.

TheRef
TheRef

@natjackm92us @komponist53 @guest123 Bush Jr. was mediocre unlike Obama who is on track to be one of the most incompetent ever. He has no clue about budgets, work or apparently the law. No surprise since he barely ever held a real job in his life.

natjackm92us
natjackm92us

@komponist53 @guest123 20 years from now, people will still think Bush was an awful president. In fact, his reputation will only grow worse with time. Get used to it. There's a reason that clown left office with a 22% approval rating.

guest123
guest123

@cwiz @guest123  Hackers are mercenaries for hire.  As were the ruthless mercenary praetorians of the Roman Republic who were eventually destroyed by imperial Rome.  Cwiz, you are not being honest about the facts.. 

cwiz
cwiz

@guest123 @cwiz  

Both are illegal.  But that doesn't make hackers, in general, "scum".  Most are actually out to prove they can, or to serve a higher principle.  Like Anonymous.  My point is that the article's responses are a bit ridiculous and that there are hundreds of thousands of hackers that are given a bad name by blackhats looking for a name.  Hackers are the praetorian of the internet.  I promise you there will come a day when you love them.

 

guest123
guest123

@cwiz @guest123   If someone steals the mail from my postbox (a federal offense), how is hoacking into my system and stealing my mail any different?