¿Cómo Se Dice ‘Vote For Me’ To Spanish Speakers?

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Both Barack Obama and Mitt Romney have new television spots up today designed to appeal to Spanish-speaking voters. But only one candidate endeavors to speak to those voters in their native language. Here is the Romney spot, with subtitles:

Here is the Obama spot, with a president trying to speak Spanish.

Now, which one do you think will be more effective?

21 comments
radsenior
radsenior

El presidente Obama en espanol. This what it's going to take to make a difference in this and future elections as the public begins to realize the impact of the largest  Socio-politico-economic grouping in America. Running this ad in the five states listed will help, but running them in states like Texas, New Mexico, Arizona, Pennsylvania and North Carolina could add a larger total to the Hispanic/Latino vote. We know the president is inclusive in his thoughts and feelings as was depicted in the PBS "Frontline" program.

                http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/pages/...

Watch it for yourself and compare Obama to Romney.

Orale, Prez!

djwilck
djwilck

As a long time student of Spanish, I thought Obama's speech was very good. Listeners can tell that he understands what he is saying. There were parts where there were important grammatical and pronunciation features, and he nailed them. Sometimes I watch news on Univision, and without fail, they find Spanish speakers in every corner of this country to comment on their stories. It is this country's second language, so well done Mr. Obama!

sixtymile
sixtymile

Not a native spanish speaker myself, but Barack sounds strongly accented but also very understandable, natural and comfortable. Mitt may be reluctant to put out an add speaking spanish considering his reactionary "base" -- sounds like typical election promises that would seem a bit implausible to most of the Latino vote.

NP042
NP042

Cómo se dice

Cómo

This is just lazy.

dcamposeco
dcamposeco

Obama's Spanish accent may not sound too appealing but at least he's not speaking in an exaggerated American accent.  Props for trying.

PaoloBernasconi
PaoloBernasconi

he he ... despite the bad debate, in which Romney won only by lying .. the poll show the President still in the lad .. . poor Romney it must be even more difficult , to lose after that 

carolerae
carolerae

 Actually, Ed Show played the president's ad tonight amp;  I thought it was touching.  There was also a Hispanic guest on who said "she got goose bumps watching it" amp; she said it was "unprecedented."  I don't like Mitt so his ad turned me off.  The president's ad seemed to play well with at least two females.

dawnkucera
dawnkucera

I've been in a lot of foreign countries.  I always tried to learn some phrases.  Even if I mangled the pronunciation,  the locals ALWAYS appreciated the effort I made.  

paulejb
paulejb

Funny. I thought that speaking English was a requirement of citizenship. Was I wrong?

Diane_dp
Diane_dp

Yes, you were wrong. Still are, in fact.

ahandout
ahandout

 Citizenship isn't even required to vote, amigo.

forgottenlord
forgottenlord

My in-laws speak Vietnamese, Fukinese, English and my father-in-law also knows Mandarin.  My mother-in-law has no level of comfort with English - she'll speak it to others, but she would rather avoid speaking it whenever possible.  My father-in-law is considerably more skilled but he prefers to talk in his native tongue.  I'm sure this is true of a number of a large percentage of immigrants - regardless of what country they're from - and it just makes sense that if you're specifically targetting that demographic, you speak to them in the language they're most comfortable with rather than the one they're "supposed" to speak in.

After all, isn't the goal of politicians to appeal to the voters?

sacredh
sacredh

Mitt has a big problem with the Latino vote as it is. Subtitles has that "I don't care" aspect to it.

kbanginmotown
kbanginmotown

Your candidate speaks fluent French. Deal with it.

kbanginmotown
kbanginmotown

Mitt could do his spiel in French, with English and Spanish subtitles.

(Oh, wait, NO!! -- French! OMGOMG!!!)

Ivy_B
Ivy_B

I have found when I'm abroad and people don't speak English, they have more sympathy and interest if I try my best with their language as opposed to carrying cards with subtitles.

sacredh
sacredh

It's the difference between trying and mailing it in. Kind of like Obama's 1st debate. I'm stilled p1ssed at Barack over his subpar effort.

forgottenlord
forgottenlord

So here's a fun question: is it better to have Mitt Romney speaking in English with Spanish subtitles or Marco Rubio speaking on Mitt's behalf in Spanish?

Further, is it better to have garbled Spanish or clean English?

JLBRUMB
JLBRUMB

So, BO is using the teleprompter in Spanish, he certainly isn't fluent, to appeal to non-English speaking voters.  Womderful!

Diane_dp
Diane_dp

And your point is what, exactly? No political ad is unrehearsed.

Someone who doesn't speak Spanish can't just read the words from a teleprompter, because they have to know the correct pronunciation. Using subtitles means someone spent a few minutes on a translation website. Actually *speaking* in a foreign language requires time and effort.

I'm supporting the person who is willing to spend the time and make the effort to speak to Hispanic Americans who aren't fluent in English. Learning a foreign language is incredibly difficult, and achieving fluency is even harder.

When my family was stationed in Spain, we made an effort to learn basic Spanish. When we were stationed in Germany, we made an effort to learn basic German. Despite our many mistakes, the people in our host nations appreciated our attempts.

nflfoghorn
nflfoghorn

Um, Two.

[Ritt couldn't hire his son to do this?]