Morning Must Reads: Survivalist

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DonQuixotic
DonQuixotic

Remember when the Republican party actually stood for fiscal prudency?  Before the LL's and Paulejb's moved their message so far right they turned into Gamma Radiation?  I miss having two remotely sane parties to choose from.

lreed580
lreed580

CNN is reporting that Akin is currently a guest on Mike Huckabee's radio show and has said he will stay in the race.

paulejb
paulejb

"Dems’ Medicare lie

Why granny should be afraid"

"Scientific evidence indicates that the changes made by ObamaCare will shorten the lives of some elderly hospital patients and make it hard for Medicare enrollees to get treated. The only thing left of Medicare is the membership card."

Read more: http://www.nypost.com/p/news/o...

deconstructiva
deconstructiva

DonQ: "It counts as a tearjerker if it makes Boehner cry?

.

Nearly everything makes Boehner cry.

(edit - Disqus moved to end of queue, not intended to be an endthread, like anyone here would ever do that.)

georgiamd
georgiamd

The U.S. debt is now 15.9 trillion dollars and the debt has increased by 48,994.13  A SECOND  since Barack Obama became president

He has been a colossal failure and should be replaced before he bankrupts our nation.U.S. National Debt Clock : Real Time  

US National Debt Clock : Real Time U.S. National Debt Clock

www.usdebtclock.org - Cached

georgiamd
georgiamd

The U.S. debt is 15.9 trillion dollars and that debt has increased by $48,994.13  PER SECOND.... since Barack Obama became president.

He has been a colossal failure and should be replaced before he bankrupts our nation.U.S. National Debt Clock : Real Time

US National Debt Clock : Real Time U.S. National Debt Clock

www.usdebtclock.org - Cached

LiberalLies2012
LiberalLies2012

What is this Drudge report all about?

SOURCES: Biden at GOP convention; Secret Service in Tampa say they are Biden advance -- he's coming Monday or Tuesday... Developing...

Hey Joe, the Democrat Convention is in North Carolina!!

Benevolent Lawyer
Benevolent Lawyer

I am outta here. See you later folks... including Paulejb and ABSOLUTELY  excluding Liberalliar. 

Benevolent Lawyer
Benevolent Lawyer

In a landmark decision, the Supreme Court ruled President Obama's healthcare

mandate is constitutional. This is a major victory for President Obama, who

spent three years promoting it, and a major setback for Mitt Romney, who spent

three years creating it. - Leno I think.

hahahahaha

 

Benevolent Lawyer
Benevolent Lawyer

This week, the president unveiled his new campaign slogan,

"Forward." ... Mitt Romney unveiled his slogan, "My money might

be offshore, but my heart's right here in America." -Leno

 

 

nflfoghorn
nflfoghorn

'Read the Bartlett article (Survivalist)...

He's 86 and believes the end is near.  Really.

rokinsteve
rokinsteve

Mother Nature wants to welcome the Gee-O-Pee with a nice bath to wash the dirt off them.  Too bad their minds will still be filthy.

outsider2011
outsider2011

 Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney believes that "some"

Americans have taken the separation of church and state too far, "well

beyond its original meaning."

In an interview released Tuesday with the Washington National Cathedral's magazine, Cathedral Age,

Romney said those who "seek to remove from the public domain any

acknowledgment of God" aren't acting in line with the Founders' intent.

The separation of church and state is enshrined in the First

Amendment of the Constitution, but Congress and the courts have debated

the practical extent of that separation since its founding.

Romney said the Founders didn't intend for "the elimination of

religion from the public square. We are a nation 'Under God, 'and in

God, we do indeed trust."

President Barack Obama also was given a chance to answer questions

about his Christian faith and about faith in public life. He called

faith a "powerful force for good," but stopped short of suggesting that

its influence in America had been forcibly diminished in recent years.

Romney, who is Mormon, didn't mention his faith by name during the

nine-page interview, but acknowledged that, "I am often asked about my

faith and my beliefs about Jesus Christ. I believe that Jesus Christ is

the Son of God and the Savior of mankind."

"Every religion has its own unique doctrines and history," he said,

and "these should not be bases for criticism but rather a test of our

tolerance."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 Is this the guy we want just a heartbeat away from the Oval Office? Someone who sanctions terms such as "legitimate rape" and "forcible rape?" Someone whose views on women's rights and issues mirrors that of a radical extremist like Akin?

It's been a hellish week for Republicans. First it was revealed that

Rep. Kevin Yoder (KS) had skinny-dipped during a drunken frat-like

frolic with about 20 other representatives, staff and families in

Israel's sacred Sea of Galilee last year just two weeks after nearly

paralyzing the nation's economy over the debt ceiling crisis.

Then Ohio GOP election official Doug Preisse told the Columbus Dispatch: "I

guess I really actually feel we shouldn't contort the voting process to

accommodate the urban -- read African-American -- voter-turnout

machine." He was referring to the state's early voting procedures.

He also voted against the weekend voting rules that made it easier for

thousands of low-income and minority voters to get to the booths in the

2008 election.

And then there's the mother of all gaffes from Missouri Congressman

and Tea Party loon Todd Akin, who's running against Claire McCaskill for

Senate: "If it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down."

Akin was explaining his strict views on abortion to a local television

news reporter. He does not support abortion even in cases of rape and

incest.

Where is the outrage among Republican leaders? The response from Mitt

Romney and his vice presidential nominee Paul Ryan has been tepid as

well. Since when is rape a political wedge issue? How would Romney,

Ryan, John Boehner, Eric Cantor, Mitch McConnell and Akin himself feel

if it was their mother, wife, sister, daughter or granddaughter who was

sexually brutalized? And just what the hell is a "legitimate" rape? Maybe it's akin (pun intended) to "forcible" rape, another favorite Republican term. Apparently these imbeciles never looked at a dictionary, which defines rape as "forcing another person to have sexual intercourse."

While Preisse's and Yoder's offenses are despicable, it is Akin's

utterly ignorant, misogynistic, insensitive, empathy-deficient remark

that's beyond the pale. These radical ultra-conservatives like Akin have

nothing but contempt for women. Their philosophies are Neanderthal and

their behavior unconscionable.

And get this: Ryan has co-sponsored not one but two bills with Akin: The Sanctity of Life Act, informally known as the "Personhood" bill, and another which would allow for abortion exception in cases of "forcible rape" only. Is this the guy we want just a heartbeat away from the Oval Office? Someone who sanctions terms such as "legitimate rape" and "forcible rape?"

Someone whose views on women's rights and issues mirrors that of a

radical extremist like Akin? But the bazillion dollar question really

is, What woman in her right mind would vote for Romney and Ryan? 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

Benevolent Lawyer
Benevolent Lawyer

I am amazed that the media has defined this election as being focused on the economy alone. After Akin, and reading Ryan's extreme views, this election is far bigger than just the economy.

Romney and Ryan are more interested in regulating womens' wombs than regulating Wall street. I read Ryan's record starting from his push to privatize SS under Bush.

If these folks are elected, the face of America will be forever changed. As it is, the rich are getting richer, and the Republican party has sold the lie to its base that as they, the rich, get richer, lower caste aka the base made up of their drivers, cooks etc, will somehow get wealthy.

Ryan's bills that never became laws read like the Communist Manifesto. 

"The new Ryan budget is a remarkable document — one that, for most of the past half-century, would have been outside the bounds of mainstream discussion due to its extreme nature. In essence, this budget is Robin Hood in reverse — on steroids. It would likely produce the largest redistribution of income from the bottom to the top in modern U.S. history and likely increase poverty and inequality more than any other budget in recent times (and possibly in the nation’s history). …

Specifically, the Ryan budget would impose extraordinary cuts in programs that serve as a lifeline for our nation’s poorest and most vulnerable citizens, and over time would cause tens of millions of Americans to lose their health insurance or

become underinsured. It would also impose severe cuts in non-defense

discretionary programs—much deeper than the across-the-board cuts

("sequestration") that are scheduled to take place starting in

January — thereby putting core government functions at still greater risk.

Indeed, a new Congressional Budget Office analysis that Chairman Ryan himself

requested shows that, after several decades, the Ryan budget would shrink the

federal government so dramatically that most of what it does outside of Social

Security, health care, and defense would essentially disappear.

 Yet alongside these extraordinary budget cuts, with their dismantling of key parts of the safety net, the budget features stunning new tax cuts for the wealthiest

Americans.

These tax cuts would come on top of the average tax cut of more than

$125,000 a year that the Tax Policy Center (TPC) estimates that people who make

over $1 million a year will receive if — as the Ryan budget also proposes

—policymakers make all of President Bush’s tax cuts permanent."

paulejb
paulejb

bobell,

"Maybe you are stupid as well.  Or just ignorant.  Have you never heard of "argument by analogy"?"

-----------------------------------------------

Did it come out of the Joseph Goebbels' School of Debate and Public Speaking?

outsider2011
outsider2011

Weather experts have their eye on storms that could affect the

Republican National Convention next week, which just so happens to be

peak hurricane season for Tampa, Fla.

The Washington Post's Capital Weather Gang reported Tuesday that the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is tracking a tropical system

headed straight for Tampa, according to several computer simulations --

though the accuracy of such forecasts seven days out is very low.

"For the moment, all we can say is that there is a small swirl in

eastern tropical Atlantic ocean that models generally agree will track

towards the northeast Caribbean over the next several days," CWG's Jason

Samenow reported. "There’s no telling how strong it will get or where

it will go beyond a few days."

Expert weather blogger Jeff Masters reported that big hurricanes have prompted mass evacuations from Tampa twice in the past 25 years.

"The first was Hurricane Elena of 1985, a Category 3 hurricane that

stalled 80 miles offshore for two days on Labor Day weekend, bringing a 6

- 7 foot storm surge, wind gusts of 80 mph, and torrential rains,"

Masters wrote. "On August 13, 2004, another mass evacuation was ordered

for Hurricane Charley. Thanks to a late track shift, Charley missed

Tampa Bay, and instead hit well to the south in Port Charlotte as a

Category 4 storm with 150 mph winds."

Masters reported that the odds of a hurricane triggering a mass

evacuation during the four-day period of the Republican National

Convention next week are less than one percent.

Even so, officials say they're ready.

"Anything can happen and there are certainly things outside of your

control, but we are comfortable we have the contingency plans in place,"

RNC spokesman James Davis told ABC News last week. (Davis declined to be more specific about contingency plans, ABC reported.)

The Associated Press reported in May that in the event of a storm, it will be up to Florida Gov. Rick Scott (R) to decide whether to reschedule the convention.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 Mitt Romney Taxes Enriched Foreign Governments At U.S. Expense

WASHINGTON -- Mitt Romney sought and received $ 787,455 in foreign tax

credits from the U.S. Treasury to cover his tax payments to other

nations in 2008.

While there is no evidence that his actions violated the law, abuse

of the foreign tax credit has been a problem for the Internal Revenue

Service. The agency has prosecuted a number of international fraud cases

in the last few years involving such credits. And the size of Romney's

claim in 2008 raises questions about the sources of his foreign income.

"This could definitely be a contributing reason for Romney's

unwillingness to disclose prior years' returns," said New York

University School of Law professor Daniel Shaviro, a tax expert.

The U.S. government provides tax credits to Americans who also pay

taxes abroad, so that foreign income is not taxed twice by different

governments. While these credits do not save U.S. residents from paying

taxes -- they still have to pay the foreign governments -- they do put a

dent in the U.S. Treasury's collections.

"In the plain-vanilla case, the taxpayer is hurting the U.S. Treasury

to the benefit of the foreign treasury, but isn't benefiting himself,"

Shaviro said.

The Huffington Post had previously reported that Romney received more than $ 25 million in foreign income between 2005 and 2010. At the time, he was governor of Massachusetts. His 2010 return

also lists foreign tax payments that Romney made dating back to 2000.

Through 2004, the payments were tiny -- for Romney -- averaging $ 37,000 a

year. In 2005, however, his foreign tax bill shot up to $ 333,149 and

stayed high for the next three years, prior to the Great Recession.

"Romney had a significant amount of foreign income," observed Rebecca

J. Wilkins, senior counsel for federal tax policy with the nonpartisan

Citizens for Tax Justice. "We don't know what the source of his foreign

income is."

The

Romney campaign declined to comment for this article, and there is no

way to determine where Romney's foreign income came from without

additional disclosures. HuffPost recently pointed out the circumstantial

evidence showing that he may have used offshore corporations to avoid paying taxes.

The total $ 787,455 credit covers both "passive income" -- dividends

and investment gains -- and "general income" -- foreign wages and

business revenue. Some money from Romney's Bermuda-based corporation, Sankaty High Yield Asset Investors Ltd., could qualify as general income.

While there is no evidence that Romney broke the law, American

taxpayers have set up illegal sham transactions involving foreign taxes

in recent years to dupe the IRS. Such transactions can involve multiple

taxpayers claiming the credit for the same foreign income or one

taxpayer claiming multiple tax credits for the same foreign income.

Individual taxpayers have also claimed credits for foreign taxes that

they never actually paid.

Much of Romney's foreign banking activity is also shrouded in secrecy. He has not released a 2010 tax form that details his foreign bank account holdings.

He has, however, disclosed the existence of a Swiss bank account. Such

accounts are prized by global elites for Swiss banks' extreme levels of

secrecy, which has allowed thousands of American taxpayers

to shield offshore income from the IRS by stashing it in Swiss

accounts. There is no evidence that Romney broke the law with his Swiss

account.

But Romney's large foreign tax credit in 2008 was unusual. Many

wealthy individuals who engage in aggressive tax planning choose to park

foreign income in tax-free jurisdictions. Romney and Bain Capital, for

instance, made extensive use of Cayman Island accounts. The U.S.

Treasury, moreover, caps the foreign tax credit at whatever the U.S. tax

rate would be on the income in question. Any additional foreign taxes

can be "carried forward" and receive a tax credit in future years.

Because Romney exceeded the foreign tax credit limit in 2008, he

received additional credits based on his 2008 income in 2009 and 2010.

"What does he have that's generating all that foreign income?" Wilkins asked.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

rokinsteve
rokinsteve

I see the cry baby ReBiblicons are out in force this morning enforcing the Romney/Ryan lies.  But not one word from them about the Republican Akin/Ryan abortion bill.  Do they really think woman are as dumb as they are?

outsider2011
outsider2011

Showing the lies and misrepresentation of the GOP towards the working poor:

Falling out of the middle class and landing in the safety net is not

as fun as some politicians say it is, according to Tanya Wells of

Williamsburg, Va. She and her husband had good jobs until 2008, but not

anymore.

"I played all my cards right before the recession," Wells said during

an unusual interview on MSNBC Sunday. "We had jobs. we were making good

money. We were your average middle class family, living comfortably.

All of a sudden the rug got pulled out from under us and we are -- along

with the rest of the people from the middle class -- we are now poor."

Wells, who is 32 and lives with her husband and two kids, relies on

Medicaid, food stamps and student loans to help take care of her family.

She said she and her husband are pursuing degrees in biology and

neuroscience in order to boost their employability. She used to work as

an oil company's logistics coordinator, her husband as a sheet metal

mechanic, and together they earned $ 100,000. Now they're bringing in

$ 18,000 -- below the federal poverty line of $ 23,050 for a family of

four.

MSNBC host Chris Hayes invited Wells on his weekend morning show

-- normally the domain of politicians and experienced talking heads --

to discuss what it's like relying on programs Republican leaders have

vowed to curtail.

"It is extremely scary experiencing what is going on right now,"

Wells said. "I have until November to try to reorganize my life plans

because I don't know which way this is going to go. And we're talking

about my family. We're talking about my dependency on the system to keep

us afloat."

Wells made similar comments in a July HuffPost story

about congressional Republican efforts to curtail the growth of the

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, informally known as food

stamps (the legislation is currently stalled). "We do hope to be off of

the system soon, because it causes a lot of extra stress to see your

only food source constantly on the line because of political battles,"

Wells said in July.

Hayes played a clip of Republican vice presidential candidate Rep.

Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) saying the American safety net has become a "hammock

that lulls able-bodied people into lives of complacency and dependency."

Wells called Ryan's statement "absolutely ridiculous," and suggested

that if the safety net were a hammock, she wouldn't be in a hurry to

get out of it. "Those programs are an extreme help to a lot of people,"

she said. "We never wanted to depend on the system, we don't like

depending on the system. It is a horrible, horrible life to be living.

All we want to do is get off the system."

CORRECTION: 9:41 p.m. -- This article has been

updated to say Tanya Wells and her husband lost their jobs in 2008. A

previous version said the layoffs happened in 2007. 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

outsider2011
outsider2011

Falling out of the middle class and landing in the safety net is not

as fun as some politicians say it is, according to Tanya Wells of

Williamsburg, Va. She and her husband had good jobs until 2008, but not

anymore.

"I played all my cards right before the recession," Wells said during

an unusual interview on MSNBC Sunday. "We had jobs. we were making good

money. We were your average middle class family, living comfortably.

All of a sudden the rug got pulled out from under us and we are -- along

with the rest of the people from the middle class -- we are now poor."

Wells, who is 32 and lives with her husband and two kids, relies on

Medicaid, food stamps and student loans to help take care of her family.

She said she and her husband are pursuing degrees in biology and

neuroscience in order to boost their employability. She used to work as

an oil company's logistics coordinator, her husband as a sheet metal

mechanic, and together they earned $100,000. Now they're bringing in

$18,000 -- below the federal poverty line of $23,050 for a family of

four.

MSNBC host Chris Hayes invited Wells on his weekend morning show

-- normally the domain of politicians and experienced talking heads --

to discuss what it's like relying on programs Republican leaders have

vowed to curtail.

"It is extremely scary experiencing what is going on right now,"

Wells said. "I have until November to try to reorganize my life plans

because I don't know which way this is going to go. And we're talking

about my family. We're talking about my dependency on the system to keep

us afloat."

Wells made similar comments in a July HuffPost story

about congressional Republican efforts to curtail the growth of the

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, informally known as food

stamps (the legislation is currently stalled). "We do hope to be off of

the system soon, because it causes a lot of extra stress to see your

only food source constantly on the line because of political battles,"

Wells said in July.

Hayes played a clip of Republican vice presidential candidate Rep.

Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) saying the American safety net has become a "hammock

that lulls able-bodied people into lives of complacency and dependency."

Wells called Ryan's statement "absolutely ridiculous," and suggested

that if the safety net were a hammock, she wouldn't be in a hurry to

get out of it. "Those programs are an extreme help to a lot of people,"

she said. "We never wanted to depend on the system, we don't like

depending on the system. It is a horrible, horrible life to be living.

All we want to do is get off the system."

CORRECTION: 9:41 p.m. -- This article has been

updated to say Tanya Wells and her husband lost their jobs in 2008. A

previous version said the layoffs happened in 2007.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 Falling out of the middle class and landing in the safety net is not

as fun as some politicians say it is, according to Tanya Wells of

Williamsburg, Va. She and her husband had good jobs until 2008, but not

anymore.

"I played all my cards right before the recession," Wells said during

an unusual interview on MSNBC Sunday. "We had jobs. we were making good

money. We were your average middle class family, living comfortably.

All of a sudden the rug got pulled out from under us and we are -- along

with the rest of the people from the middle class -- we are now poor."

Wells, who is 32 and lives with her husband and two kids, relies on

Medicaid, food stamps and student loans to help take care of her family.

She said she and her husband are pursuing degrees in biology and

neuroscience in order to boost their employability. She used to work as

an oil company's logistics coordinator, her husband as a sheet metal

mechanic, and together they earned $100,000. Now they're bringing in

$18,000 -- below the federal poverty line of $23,050 for a family of

four.

MSNBC host Chris Hayes invited Wells on his weekend morning show

-- normally the domain of politicians and experienced talking heads --

to discuss what it's like relying on programs Republican leaders have

vowed to curtail.

"It is extremely scary experiencing what is going on right now,"

Wells said. "I have until November to try to reorganize my life plans

because I don't know which way this is going to go. And we're talking

about my family. We're talking about my dependency on the system to keep

us afloat."

Wells made similar comments in a July HuffPost story

about congressional Republican efforts to curtail the growth of the

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, informally known as food

stamps (the legislation is currently stalled). "We do hope to be off of

the system soon, because it causes a lot of extra stress to see your

only food source constantly on the line because of political battles,"

Wells said in July.

Hayes played a clip of Republican vice presidential candidate Rep.

Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) saying the American safety net has become a "hammock

that lulls able-bodied people into lives of complacency and dependency."

Wells called Ryan's statement "absolutely ridiculous," and suggested

that if the safety net were a hammock, she wouldn't be in a hurry to

get out of it. "Those programs are an extreme help to a lot of people,"

she said. "We never wanted to depend on the system, we don't like

depending on the system. It is a horrible, horrible life to be living.

All we want to do is get off the system."

CORRECTION: 9:41 p.m. -- This article has been

updated to say Tanya Wells and her husband lost their jobs in 2008. A

previous version said the layoffs happened in 2007.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 Falling out of the middle class and landing in the safety net is not

as fun as some politicians say it is, according to Tanya Wells of

Williamsburg, Va. She and her husband had good jobs until 2008, but not

anymore.

"I played all my cards right before the recession," Wells said during

an unusual interview on MSNBC Sunday. "We had jobs. we were making good

money. We were your average middle class family, living comfortably.

All of a sudden the rug got pulled out from under us and we are -- along

with the rest of the people from the middle class -- we are now poor."

Wells, who is 32 and lives with her husband and two kids, relies on

Medicaid, food stamps and student loans to help take care of her family.

She said she and her husband are pursuing degrees in biology and

neuroscience in order to boost their employability. She used to work as

an oil company's logistics coordinator, her husband as a sheet metal

mechanic, and together they earned $100,000. Now they're bringing in

$18,000 -- below the federal poverty line of $23,050 for a family of

four.

MSNBC host Chris Hayes invited Wells on his weekend morning show

-- normally the domain of politicians and experienced talking heads --

to discuss what it's like relying on programs Republican leaders have

vowed to curtail.

"It is extremely scary experiencing what is going on right now,"

Wells said. "I have until November to try to reorganize my life plans

because I don't know which way this is going to go. And we're talking

about my family. We're talking about my dependency on the system to keep

us afloat."

Wells made similar comments in a July HuffPost story

about congressional Republican efforts to curtail the growth of the

Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, informally known as food

stamps (the legislation is currently stalled). "We do hope to be off of

the system soon, because it causes a lot of extra stress to see your

only food source constantly on the line because of political battles,"

Wells said in July.

Hayes played a clip of Republican vice presidential candidate Rep.

Paul Ryan (R-Wis.) saying the American safety net has become a "hammock

that lulls able-bodied people into lives of complacency and dependency."

Wells called Ryan's statement "absolutely ridiculous," and suggested

that if the safety net were a hammock, she wouldn't be in a hurry to

get out of it. "Those programs are an extreme help to a lot of people,"

she said. "We never wanted to depend on the system, we don't like

depending on the system. It is a horrible, horrible life to be living.

All we want to do is get off the system."

CORRECTION: 9:41 p.m. -- This article has been

updated to say Tanya Wells and her husband lost their jobs in 2008. A

previous version said the layoffs happened in 2007. 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/...