4.8 million

The number of Americans with security clearance to access classified information, up 3% from 2010–a marker of the U.S. intelligence community’s continued expansion a decade after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks.

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James
James

my best

friend's aunt makes $84 an hour on the internet. She has been out of a

job for 6 months but last month her paycheck was $19181 just working on

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Swag
Swag

my roomate's

sister makes $84 hourly on the internet. She has been unemployed for

six months but last month her pay was $16692 just working on the

internet for a few hours. Read more on this web site http://www.LazyCash49.com

ARTraveler
ARTraveler

Remember that it is always easier to classify something and be wrong on the side of over-classification rather than not classify something that shows up in a report in some newspaper or magazine in another country.

gysgt213
gysgt213

This does not mean everyone with a security clearance has access to all classified material.  You still have to have a job related reason to access classified material.  Some people with clearance never ever see any classified materials.

ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®©
ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®©

And see how much safer we all are?

Thank you, National Security State.

Remember, you have nothing to fear unless you have something to hide.

~

gumOnShoe
gumOnShoe

This is more likely due to the increase in the number of people being hired into the CS portion of the government. Most coding jobs require security clearance, and as the government ramps up to deal with electronic warfare, more security clearances seam a must to me. I'm not sure this really signals an expansion of the intelligence agency in the way you're implying it does.

And this is an example of why we should probably have well researched articles rather than just numbers. :/

ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®©
ifthethunderdontgetya™³²®©

 "Document classification, already at record highs under the Bush Administration, has continued to explode as well. The government classified a staggering 77 million documents in 2010, a 40% increase over the previous year."

https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/...

~

gumOnShoe
gumOnShoe

Any idea if those documents include code? Because if they do, your average mid-scale program could have upwards of 500 classes, which could translate to well over a 1000 files for a compiled program.

Larger programs could take up even more space.

Then if you get into drones, the code and blueprints of those could all be classified as well, creating an even larger set of files.

I'm just saying that in the electronic age, there's far more to classify than there used to be; and I wouldn't be surprised if that's accelerating. I don't work for the government, but I do process electronic documents for a living and you'd be staggered at how much paper a small business could produce. If they work for the government making something all of that could get classified. :/