Morning Must Reads: Conspiracy

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MomentoMori
MomentoMori

Uh-oh, looks likes paulie's in the minority. As usual.

A majority of Americans, including almost a third of Republicans, say GOP presidential contender Mitt Romney should release more tax returns than the two years he has promised to disclose, a USA TODAY/Gallup Poll finds.

Check the link, the results are brutal. I doubt Romney's going to be able to ride this out. A lot of Americans already believe the game is rigged for the folks at the top. Romney's tax returns might confirm that belief.

If it does, he's toast.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/p...

MomentoMori
MomentoMori

Since paulie likes pictures, here's one I'm sure he'll enjoy.

Fun fact: Nero didn't actually fidddle while Rome burned, that was propaganda made up by his opponents. Ironic, no? Too bad book learnin' is a no-no is rightwingland.

http://24.media.tumblr.com/tum...

paulejb
paulejb

Steve0T,

"Nothing in life is a surety, sport."

-----------------------------------

There is no doubt whatsoever that Barack Hussein Obama = EPIC FAIL 

paulejb
paulejb

MrObvious,

"Bane lives on you know."

-----------------------------------

I am sure he does. He is sure to be present in spirit wherever the imbeciles of OCCUPY STUPIDITY gather. 

paulejb
paulejb

MrObvious,

"Yes paulejb, I AM a government worker monitoring people such as yourself and we did re-assign someone hired to monitor you."

-------------------------------------------------------

Hope they are enjoying themselves as much as I am.

Ivy_B
Ivy_B

Wonder how the other people with MS manage their treatments?

How many people have MS?Approximately 400,000 Americans have MS, and every week about 200 people are diagnosed. World-wide, MS affects about 2.5 million people. Because the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) does not require U.S. physicians to report new cases, and because symptoms can be completely invisible, the numbers can only be estimated.

Must be a lot of horses around.

paulejb
paulejb

Steve0T,

"LOL, did an extra-terrestrial tell you that??"

--------------------------------------------------------

Why are you bringing your folks into this, Stevie?

paulejb
paulejb

Steve0T,

"Typical conservative response:  it's always the other guy's fault."

-------------------------------------------

Typical politically illiterate lib. To the voter, the president is the government not some backbencher in the House.  

"In Fight for the House, the Trajectory Is Clear"

"Democratic strategists need a dramatic shift in the House playing field if they are going to have any chance of netting the 25 seats they need to regain a majority in the House of Representatives. And that outcome looks increasingly remote."

http://www.rollcall.com/issues...

paulejb
paulejb

Steve0T,

"The Rmoney campaign disagrees with you"

---------------------------------------

Outdated info, Stevie. The CBS/NYTIMES poll set them straight.

Then there is this:

 "Tied in Virginia: Romney 44, Obama 44"

http://www.weeklystandard.com/... 

outsider2011
outsider2011

Making his first television network

appearance last night on Fox News, a perfectly coifed George Zimmerman

apologized for killing 17-year-old Trayvon Martin—while in the same

breath admitted he’d do nothing different if he had the chance. As

Zimmerman, who appeared dazed during parts of the interview, discussed

the events that led to the death of an unarmed high-school student

simply walking home from the 7-Eleven, it was difficult to imagine a

similar chain of events occurring if the tables were turned.

Just

prior to yesterday’s interview, Zimmerman’s lawyer Mark O’Mara released

a statement boldly admitting that part of the reason for the appearance

on Fox was to raise money for his client’s defense. Zimmerman has

already received a pretty staggering amount of donations since his

arrest this past April. So much so that in June, his bail was revoked

due to the fact he failed to report at least $ 150,000

in an online account donated from his many supporters. What if every

criminal was allowed a prime time interview in order to raise money for

his or her defense?

Let’s

take it further. Imagine for just a moment if Zimmerman were a black

man (Zimmerman is the product of a white father and Hispanic mother). He

shoots and kills an unarmed white teenager because said teenager

“appeared” to be acting suspicious in his neighborhood community one

night. Though the now dead teenager has only a cell phone, Skittles, and

iced tea on him, the black man who pulled the trigger not only gets to

go home that very night, but he remains free for another 44 days,

reportedly because of a self-defense law called “stand your ground.” Only marches and public outcry by white leaders lead to his arrest, but he isn’t in jail long. Even after it’s revealed that he wasn’t truthful with the court

about his finances and ability to flee the country, he’s freed once

again and then given an extended Hollywood-style interview on a

top-rated news program to tell his ever changing story.

And Zimmerman’s story does change.

The night of the shooting, he told the police dispatcher that Martin was

running away in the rain, causing him to become concerned. Last night

he told Fox News that the teen was not running but skipping in the rain. That’s a big difference.

Zimmerman

and his lawyer also explained to Fox News that he didn’t ignore a

Sanford police dispatcher’s clear instructions to stay in his car and

not follow the young man with the hoodie running/skipping in the rain.

Zimmerman, who lived in the community, said he got out of his vehicle

not to follow Martin but to check the street name for the dispatcher.

Shouldn’t a person so staunchly committed to safety, order, and the

neighborhood watch know the street names in his own community? Would anyone honestly give a

28-year-old black man the benefit of the doubt telling the same story

when a Sanford police officer filed a report that night stating clearly

that this tragedy was avoidable had Zimmerman just followed instructions

and stayed in his car? Would Fox or any other major news channel dare

give him 40 minutes to explain away the senseless death of someone’s

child who’d done nothing but walk home from the store with a hoodie on

while being black? What network would offer a black man a chance to

“humanize” himself in an effort to raise more money for his defense for

murdering someone whom he deemed “unfit” for his neighborhood but had

committed no crime? And would thousands of strangers send money to

support a black man who instead of showing real remorse to the parents

of the teenager killed by saying he’d do anything to avoid their child

dying at his hands, actually had the gall to say on TV that it was God’s

will that the events of that night happened? As Trayvon Martin’s father

Tracy said in a statement late last night, “We must worship a different

God.’’

Imagine

anyone being truly sympathetic to a black man who admitted he never

once identified himself to the teenager as a member of the neighborhood

watch, which may have given the teenager a very real reason to be afraid

for his own life. It’s difficult to believe anyone would be so

sympathetic if the tables were indeed turned, and the faces of the

accused and the deceased were reversed. But sadly, George Zimmerman is

and will continue to be a hero to far too many willing and ready to

believe that an unarmed young black teenager minding his own business

got exactly what he deserved when he was shot to death that February

night.http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 

How does the brave new world of campaign financing created by the Supreme Court’s Citizens United decision stack up against Watergate? The short answer is: Things are even worse now than they were then.

The 1974 scandal that brought down President Richard Nixon was all

about illegal money secretly flowing to politicians. That’s still a

danger, but these days, the biggest weakness of our campaign finance

system is not what’s illegal, but what’s legal. As Dan Eggen of the Washington Post put it,

“there’s little need for furtive fundraising or secret handoffs of

cash.” The rules increasing allow people and corporations with great

wealth to skew public policy toward their interests—without risking a

jail time, or a fine, or any penalty at all. It’s an influence

free-for-all.

The Washington Post reminds us

what the country faced in the time of Watergate: “Money ran wild in

American politics. One man, W. Clement Stone, gave more than $ 2 million

to President Richard M. Nixon’s 1972 reelection campaign. The Watergate

break-in was financed with secret campaign contributions. Fat cats

plunked down cash for ambassadorships, and corporations for special

treatment.” Fred Wertheimer,

who has been pushing for campaign finance reform for decades, recounts

that the corruption of old got results: “The dairy industry gave $2

million to the Nixon campaign and soon got the increase in dairy price

supports they were seeking. Nixon overrode his Agriculture Department’s

objection to put these supports in place.”    

http://www.slate.com/articles/...

outsider2011
outsider2011

  

Chris Christie: Pitbull without lipstick

Sorry, Sarah Palin. The N.J. governor gets

to play your attack-dog role in Tampa, savaging Obama to promote Romney.

BuzzFeed revealed Wednesday

that the Mitt Romney campaign is so desperate, it’s outsourcing its

strategy to the late Andrew Breitbart. In his last appearance at the

Conservative Political Action Committee, Breitbart vowed to launch a

“vet the president” crusade, insisting the mainstream media failed to

properly vet Barack Obama in 2008. After Breitbart’s death, his minions

made good on his promise with Obama “scoops” so un-amazing I can’t

remember them without using Google. Now Romney’s folks are promising to

use Obama’s admitted youthful drug use, his Chicago-politics ties and

his overall “foreignness” against him, telling BuzzFeed, “It’s time to

vet the president … McCain didn’t do it.”

Oh good: Earlier this week the Romney folks pis sed off 2008 vice-presidential nominee Sarah Palin

by confirming she hadn’t yet been invited to the RNC convention in

Tampa. Now they’re dissing the man at the top of the 2008 ticket, John

McCain. That seems like smart politics.

With the announcement that

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will be the keynote speaker at the Tampa

convention, Romney’s strategy is completely clear: He’s going to run a

campaign that’s long on meanness and short on substance, to capitalize

on the GOP’s base hatred of Obama and to distract attention from its

disdain for Romney. With Christie as keynote, who needs Palin?

Sure,

Palin may be the political Queen of Mean, but Christie is its

undisputed king. And let me say this about the former Alaska governor

(of whom I’m unambiguously not a fan): She has never been caught on

camera bullying a constituent. Sure, she sneers at the “lamestream

media,” but she’s never called a reporter an “idiot” to his face, in

front of a camera. Palin loved to trash Obama, on the 2008 campaign

trail and ever since, but she doesn’t seem to get her jollies, publicly

at least, humiliating any random person who crosses her.

That’s Chris Christie’s thing.

Also:

Again, I’m no fan of Palin, but I think it’s interesting that Romney

has appeased the Tea Party by flip-flopping and adopting most of its

extremist positions, but he can’t be bothered to figure out a way to

respect and/or flatter Palin by including her, somehow, in the Tampa

festivities. On the other hand, he’s got a lot of other former rivals to

appease in Tampa: Ron Paul, Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich, Rick Perry

and Donald Trump, to name a few. It’s no accident that many of the

people clamoring for Romney to release his tax returns either worked for

or supported those other guys – or are among those other guys. Among

those calling for more Romney tax transparency are Perry, Paul, Gingrich

ally Rick Tyler, Santorum backers Bill Kristol and John Brabender, and

former RNC chairs Haley Barbour and Michael Steele.

As the Huffington Post’s Howard Fineman notes,

the range of Republicans parting ways with Romney on taxes — which also

includes the National Review and the Wall Street Journal — seems to

point to a party having trouble recognizing Romney as its leader, or

expecting him to fail in November, or both. I made that point when

former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and current Florida Sen. Marco Rubio

rebuked Romney on taxes and immigration. This is a party in

near-meltdown.

Enter Chris Christie.

Former Nixon strategist

Kevin Phillips famously told Garry Wills that “the whole secret of

politics [is] knowing who hates who.” And Christie seems able to channel

hate as well as anybody, which makes sense, since he’s the kind of

white Catholic “ethnic” Phillips predicted Nixon could pick up from the

working-class “sidewalks of New York” (which in Phillips’ analysis

included New Jersey.)  Christie is the guy who complained about being

dissed by his music idol, Bruce Springsteen (Jersey’s favorite son won’t

meet with the Jersey governor), while also attacking Springsteen’s

politics. He’s got some anger issues. Way too volatile to be the VP

nominee, Christie is perfect to introduce Romney in Tampa by trashing

Obama.

On Tuesday we saw Romney surrogate John Sununu complain that Obama

needs to “learn how to be an American,” while Romney himself called the

president’s approach to American life “extraordinarily foreign.” In case

anyone wondered whether those attacks amounted to an official campaign

direction, an anonymous Romney source previewed the fall campaign for

BuzzFeed this way: “I mean, this is a guy who admitted to cocaine use,

had a sweetheart deal with his house in Chicago, and was associated and

worked with Rod Blagojevich to get Valerie Jarrett appointed to the

Senate. The bottom line is there’ll be counterattacks.”

It may

just be coincidence that the same day the unnamed Romney official

insulted McCain for failing to “vet” Obama, McCain had a moment of

decency standing up against crazy Michele Bachmann to defend Hillary

Clinton aide Huma Abedin, who’s been attacked by Bachmann for her late

father’s alleged ties to alleged figures friendly to the Muslim

Brotherhood. Bachmann is our 21st-century Joe McCarthy, with lipstick.

McCain 2008 campaign officials also chose Wednesday to tell reporters

they picked Palin as VP because she was the best person for the job. It

was a clever way of saying the choice wasn’t about secrets in Romney’s

tax returns, while at the same time diminishing Romney.

In Ohio Wednesday,

Romney got credit for replying, when an audience member used the word

“monster” to describe Obama, “That’s not a term I would use.” Bully for

him, although it’s not the same as McCain calling Obama “a decent family

man, a citizen,” after a 2008 supporter said he was “an Arab” she

“didn’t trust.” Weirdly, Romney used almost the exact same words when

asked to rebuke Rush Limbaugh for calling Sandra Fluke a “sl ut,” saying

prissily, “That’s not language I would use.” Is that as aggressive as

Romney’s decency-programming gets?

Make no mistake, it’s going to

be ugly from here to November, as BuzzFeed’s Romney sources made clear.

The president will get relief, though, when Republicans turn their fire

away from him and toward one another.

http://www.salon.com/2012/07/1...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 

Chris Christie: Pitbull without lipstick

Sorry, Sarah Palin. The N.J. governor gets

to play your attack-dog role in Tampa, savaging Obama to promote Romney.

BuzzFeed revealed Wednesday

that the Mitt Romney campaign is so desperate, it’s outsourcing its

strategy to the late Andrew Breitbart. In his last appearance at the

Conservative Political Action Committee, Breitbart vowed to launch a

“vet the president” crusade, insisting the mainstream media failed to

properly vet Barack Obama in 2008. After Breitbart’s death, his minions

made good on his promise with Obama “scoops” so un-amazing I can’t

remember them without using Google. Now Romney’s folks are promising to

use Obama’s admitted youthful drug use, his Chicago-politics ties and

his overall “foreignness” against him, telling BuzzFeed, “It’s time to

vet the president … McCain didn’t do it.”

Oh good: Earlier this week the Romney folks pissed off 2008 vice-presidential nominee Sarah Palin

by confirming she hadn’t yet been invited to the RNC convention in

Tampa. Now they’re dissing the man at the top of the 2008 ticket, John

McCain. That seems like smart politics.

With the announcement that

New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie will be the keynote speaker at the Tampa

convention, Romney’s strategy is completely clear: He’s going to run a

campaign that’s long on meanness and short on substance, to capitalize

on the GOP’s base hatred of Obama and to distract attention from its

disdain for Romney. With Christie as keynote, who needs Palin?

Sure,

Palin may be the political Queen of Mean, but Christie is its

undisputed king. And let me say this about the former Alaska governor

(of whom I’m unambiguously not a fan): She has never been caught on

camera bullying a constituent. Sure, she sneers at the “lamestream

media,” but she’s never called a reporter an “idiot” to his face, in

front of a camera. Palin loved to trash Obama, on the 2008 campaign

trail and ever since, but she doesn’t seem to get her jollies, publicly

at least, humiliating any random person who crosses her.

That’s Chris Christie’s thing.

Also:

Again, I’m no fan of Palin, but I think it’s interesting that Romney

has appeased the Tea Party by flip-flopping and adopting most of its

extremist positions, but he can’t be bothered to figure out a way to

respect and/or flatter Palin by including her, somehow, in the Tampa

festivities. On the other hand, he’s got a lot of other former rivals to

appease in Tampa: Ron Paul, Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich, Rick Perry

and Donald Trump, to name a few. It’s no accident that many of the

people clamoring for Romney to release his tax returns either worked for

or supported those other guys – or are among those other guys. Among

those calling for more Romney tax transparency are Perry, Paul, Gingrich

ally Rick Tyler, Santorum backers Bill Kristol and John Brabender, and

former RNC chairs Haley Barbour and Michael Steele.

As the Huffington Post’s Howard Fineman notes,

the range of Republicans parting ways with Romney on taxes — which also

includes the National Review and the Wall Street Journal — seems to

point to a party having trouble recognizing Romney as its leader, or

expecting him to fail in November, or both. I made that point when

former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and current Florida Sen. Marco Rubio

rebuked Romney on taxes and immigration. This is a party in

near-meltdown.

Enter Chris Christie.

Former Nixon strategist

Kevin Phillips famously told Garry Wills that “the whole secret of

politics [is] knowing who hates who.” And Christie seems able to channel

hate as well as anybody, which makes sense, since he’s the kind of

white Catholic “ethnic” Phillips predicted Nixon could pick up from the

working-class “sidewalks of New York” (which in Phillips’ analysis

included New Jersey.)  Christie is the guy who complained about being

dissed by his music idol, Bruce Springsteen (Jersey’s favorite son won’t

meet with the Jersey governor), while also attacking Springsteen’s

politics. He’s got some anger issues. Way too volatile to be the VP

nominee, Christie is perfect to introduce Romney in Tampa by trashing

Obama.

On Tuesday we saw Romney surrogate John Sununu complain that Obama

needs to “learn how to be an American,” while Romney himself called the

president’s approach to American life “extraordinarily foreign.” In case

anyone wondered whether those attacks amounted to an official campaign

direction, an anonymous Romney source previewed the fall campaign for

BuzzFeed this way: “I mean, this is a guy who admitted to cocaine use,

had a sweetheart deal with his house in Chicago, and was associated and

worked with Rod Blagojevich to get Valerie Jarrett appointed to the

Senate. The bottom line is there’ll be counterattacks.”

It may

just be coincidence that the same day the unnamed Romney official

insulted McCain for failing to “vet” Obama, McCain had a moment of

decency standing up against crazy Michele Bachmann to defend Hillary

Clinton aide Huma Abedin, who’s been attacked by Bachmann for her late

father’s alleged ties to alleged figures friendly to the Muslim

Brotherhood. Bachmann is our 21st-century Joe McCarthy, with lipstick.

McCain 2008 campaign officials also chose Wednesday to tell reporters

they picked Palin as VP because she was the best person for the job. It

was a clever way of saying the choice wasn’t about secrets in Romney’s

tax returns, while at the same time diminishing Romney.

In Ohio Wednesday,

Romney got credit for replying, when an audience member used the word

“monster” to describe Obama, “That’s not a term I would use.” Bully for

him, although it’s not the same as McCain calling Obama “a decent family

man, a citizen,” after a 2008 supporter said he was “an Arab” she

“didn’t trust.” Weirdly, Romney used almost the exact same words when

asked to rebuke Rush Limbaugh for calling Sandra Fluke a “slut,” saying

prissily, “That’s not language I would use.” Is that as aggressive as

Romney’s decency-programming gets?

Make no mistake, it’s going to

be ugly from here to November, as BuzzFeed’s Romney sources made clear.

The president will get relief, though, when Republicans turn their fire

away from him and toward one another.

http://www.salon.com/2012/07/1...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 Presto! The Disclose Act disappears

Republicans in lockstep to block campaign-finance legislation

Ask any magician and they’ll tell you that the secret to a successful

magic trick is misdirection – distracting the crowd so they don’t

realize how they’re being fooled. Get them watching your left hand while

your right hand palms the silver dollar: “Now you see it, now you

don’t.” The purloined coin now belongs to the magician.

Just like

democracy. Once upon a time conservatives supported the full disclosure

of campaign contributors.  Now they oppose it with their might — and

magic, especially when it comes to unlimited cash from corporations. My

goodness, they say, with a semantic wave of the wand, what’s the big

deal? Nary a single Fortune 500 company has given a nickel to the super

PACs. (Even that’s not entirely true, by the way.)

Meanwhile the

other hand is poking around for loopholes, stuffing millions of secret

corporate dollars into nonprofit tax-exempt organizations called 501(c)s

that funnel the money into advertising on behalf of candidates or

causes. Legally, in part because the Federal Election Commission does

not consider them political committees, they can keep it all nice and

anonymous, never revealing who’s really behind the donations or the

political ads they buy. This is especially handy for corporations – why

risk offending customers by revealing your politics or letting them know

how much you’re willing to shell out for a permanent piece of an

obliging politician?

That’s why passing a piece of legislation

called the Disclose Act is so important and that’s why on Monday,

Republicans in the Senate killed it. Again.

Why? Senate Majority

Leader Harry Reid: “Perhaps Republicans want to shield the handful of

billionaires willing to contribute nine figures to sway a close

presidential election.” The election, he said, may be bought by “17

angry, old, white men.”

http://www.salon.com/2012/07/1...

paulejb
paulejb

"Obama Ad Accuses Romney of 'Launching a False Attack' for Quoting Obama"

http://www.weeklystandard.com/... 

Philosophical question: If you quote a liar verbatim does that make you a liar too?

outsider2011
outsider2011

 GOP's America - this is what they're pushing for:

We’re a country that lets kids go homeless

Family homelessness barely existed until the

1980s. The financial crisis has made the problem worse

“All of a sudden, around the early 1980s we started to see tons of

families who were there because of poverty,” Ralph da Costa-Núñez, who

worked in Mayor Ed Koch’s administration and is now CEO of Homes for the

Homeless, tells AlterNet.

The reasons behind the jump in family

homelessness are not complex, Núñez says. “It was the gutting of the

safety net. Reagan cut every social program that helped the poor. Then

there’s inflation so their aid checks are shrinking. Where are they

going? Into the streets, into the shelters.”

http://www.salon.com/2012/07/1...

paulejb
paulejb

Steve0T,

Are you rokinsteve in drag? Just asking.

paulejb
paulejb

MrObvious,

"You can file his take on a villian from 1993 under his take on if Han Solo really shot first or not and if that is the work of the liberal cabal."

--------------------------------------

You've got me all wrong, Ob. I can't wait to see this flick. I am delighted that Batman is taking on the OCCUPY STUPIDITY crowd.

paulejb
paulejb

MrObvious,

"None of us do. We're liberal guvmint workers."

--------------------------------------------------------

Ah! Parasitical organisms.

paulejb
paulejb

Steve0T,

"What contradiction are you speaking off? Rmoney has been shouting from the rooftops that he will send the forces against Iran."

-----------------------------------------

Every BS meter in the place just went off, Stevie. Can't you come up with some more subtle lies like your hero in the White House?

paulejb
paulejb

SteveoT,

"What contradiction are you speaking off? Rmoney has been shouting from the rooftops that he will send the forces against Iran."

------------------------------------

Now you are just making sh*t up, Stevie.

paulejb
paulejb

Our Food Stamp president is allying with Mexico to extend dependency continent wide.

"USDA partnering with Mexico to boost food stamp participation"

"The Mexican government has been working with the United States Department of Agriculture to increase participation in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), or food stamps."

Read more: http://dailycaller.com/2012/07...