Morning Must Reads: Returns

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jmac
jmac

"Republicans now dislike the Robert's Court".   Was his 'switch in time saves nine' due to the "lunatics" on the court?   They've certainly made me quit pulling the lever for Republicans so the theory could have some basis of  truth. 

http://opinionator.blogs.nytim...

sacredh
sacredh

Adam, if you get a little free time before you call it a day, would you consider tossing out a "1000 Words" for the weekend? It's Friday the 13th btw. Gotta dig out the mask and a machette.

MomentoMori
MomentoMori

The lead-in...

 "Bain documents back up the story that he ceded management in 1999."

...and this line from the article ....

"He didn't formally give up his title and firm ownership until 2002, once

the Games had been successful and he was interested in other elective

office."

....seem somewhat in conflict.

Romney may or may not have been making day-to-day decisions, but his responsibility doesn't end because he decided not to show up for work that day. He still had a title and ownership.

I know 'personal responsibility' has become a rhetorical punchline for Republicans, but think the phrase applies in this case? That's like saying that since Bush ceded management to Cheney on most foreign policy matters, he wasn't REALLY the President, and it's unfair to attack him for anything that happened while he was formally the President.

jmac
jmac

Did you not get the MSM memo?  This issue is dead in the water.  I read it on the front page of the NY Times.    We're suppose to be talking about what each candidate will do should they win.  Now it's up to the MSM to get Romney to speak up.  Good luck with that one, Andrea Mitchell.  

Ivy_B
Ivy_B

Hmm, which should have more weight? Internal documents constructed by Bain to selll their products or SEC filings and finiancial disclosure forms that are certified to be true. Hard to say.

LiberalLies2012
LiberalLies2012

Speaking of transparency....

Somehow Jay gets "college transcripts" mixed up with "birth certificates". Yes, we would like to see the college transcripts.

What are you hiding Barry?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...

3xfire3
3xfire3

"What are you hiding Barry?"

That GW Bush had a higher GPA at Harvard than Obama did. He doesn't want to admit that Bush is smarter than he is. 

nflfoghorn
nflfoghorn

[spews coffee at screen]

sacredh
sacredh

nfl, I enjoy a sentimental love story too.

nflfoghorn
nflfoghorn

Snickers

Looking for Mr. Goodbar.

sacredh
sacredh

Bush is whiter than Obama. Smarter? Snickers.

Tero1
Tero1

"Yes, we would like to see the college transcripts. What are you hiding Barry?"

Translation: "

There's no way some darky got edumucated! He must have been one of those affirmitive action cases!"

paulejb
paulejb

Tero1,

Odd that some Canadian backwoodsman keeps trafficking in racial stereotypes. What's going on up there?

Paul Dirks
Paul Dirks

Here's a question I haven't seen addressed yet. When Romney took his leave of absense, he turned responsibility for operations over to 26 "managing directors."

So what process led those people to become managing directors? I mean, if Romney's going to wash his hands over anything that happened after he left, he's going to have to figure out how to wash his hands of the personnel decisions that led to those decisionmakers being in place who did all the stuff he wants to deny.

  

outsider2011
outsider2011

 

Did Romney want to get booed?

Nancy Pelosi says the candidate wanted to

get booed at the NAACP. Why she might be right.

The big news out of Mitt Romney’s speech yesterday at the NAACP was

that the audience booed his pledge to repeal “Obamacare.” The jeers have

been cast as a rude slight against a candidate making a good-faith

effort to step outside his comfort zone and appeal to a skeptical

audience, but what if Romney went to Houston intending to spark boos all

along?

That’s what some top Democrats are alleging. “I think it was a calculated move on his part to get booed at the NAACP convention,” House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi told Bloomberg TV yesterday in an interview.

Romney

himself hinted at this in an interview with Fox News after the event,

saying he anticipated all along that he’d get booed. “I think we

expected that, of course,” he told host Neil Cavuto. Democratic

strategist Kombiz Lavasany suggested “Romney’s press staff was bragging about getting booed,” noting that his traveling press secretary had retweeted multiple news stories about the incident.

Pelosi didn’t elaborate, but she’s not alone. “I believe he included that part of the speech intentionally,”

Atlanta Mayor Kasim Reed said on a conference call organized by the

Democratic National Committee. “He wasn’t speaking to the NAACP audience

at all … [but] to his base. It will make him look strong.” Rev. Al

Sharpton told MSNBC’s Tamron Hall, “I think that what was interesting to

me is, I think it was calculated,

Tamron, that he was going to attack the president’s Affordable Health

Care Act, call it ‘Obamacare’ and expect that he would get some kind of

displeasure from the audience.” Avis Jones-DeWeever, the executive

director of the National Council of Negro Women, said Romney had

accomplished a “calculated political ploy.” “That was exactly what he went there intending to do,” she said.

http://www.salon.com/2012/07/1...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 

Mitt’s self-inflicted wounds

He made the timing of his Bain departure an

issue trying to deflect outsourcing charges. Why not embrace his past?

Mitt Romney’s campaign started Thursday with a rough ad calling

President Obama a liar for his charges about Bain Capital outsourcing.

It ended the day demanding Obama apologize for a campaign staffer who

suggested Romney’s confusing statements on when he left Bain might have

involved a “felony.” Oh, and for good measure? The campaign also

demanded that the Boston Globe retract the story that led to Stephanie Cutter’s “felon” suggestion:

It revealed that while Romney insists he left Bain in February 1999,

SEC filings show the firm still listed him as CEO as late as 2002.

I’m

not calling Romney a felon, but it seems like providing incorrect or

misleading information to the SEC could be a serious problem, either for

Romney or for Bain Capital. I admit, the actual details of when Romney

left Bain and what role, if any, he continued to play after February

1999 remain murky. But it seems to me Romney made these timing questions

an issue himself, by trying to insist that Bain’s outsourcing

adventures took place after he left the firm to run the Salt Lake City

Olympics. By the way, the Romney campaign also demanded that the

Washington Post retract its original story about Bain’s investments in outsourcing. The Post refused, and the Globe will too. Both papers had solid documentation for their stories.

The

real problem is that Romney made his qualifications as a business

leader his main calling card as a presidential candidate – and

immediately began backpedaling away from his career. First he described

himself as a “job creator,” but when his own GOP rivals began digging up

stories about Bain’s role in destroying jobs, he stopped making that

claim, while accusing his rivals of demonizing capitalism. Then, when

the Obama campaign, and later the Washington Post, began pointing to

Bain’s investments in firms that sent jobs overseas, and even firms that

specialized in helping other firms send jobs overseas, he insisted he

was being blamed for investments and/or decisions made after he left

Bain – setting off this search for proof of when he actually left the

firm. Before the Boston Globe, both David Corn at Mother Jones and Talking Points Memo also found documents listing Romney as still involved at Bain later than he claimed.

More

documents will almost certainly emerge. From SEC filings to Romney’s

various state and federal financial disclosure forms over the years,

there’s an amazing array of paperwork telling different stories about

when Romney left Bain.

It’s worth remembering that when he was

running for Massachusetts governor in 2002, there were questions about

his eligibility for state office, given that he’d spent two years

working in Salt Lake City. That’s when Romney described himself as only

on leave from Bain. In 2002 Massachusetts disclosure forms he signed in

2003, Romney listed himself as a Bain “executive,” making more than

$100,000 a year. So back when it was useful to have Bain ties, Romney

pointed to them. Now it’s politically useful to have cut those ties in

early 1999, so that’s the story Romney tells.

http://www.salon.com/2012/07/1...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 

Thank go d for taxes

Politicians treat firefighters like pawns.

When my house burned down, I learned how valuable public servants can be.

The more I think about this the more amazed I become. The

firefighters told me that the fire had been an especially tricky one;

they’d had to play whack - a - mole as it darted through the back wall from

the basement to the attic. They were operating in the dark, in an old

wooden house — just a few days earlier, a similar house had caught fire

and the owner had died before the firefighters could get to her. Yet

somehow, in the midst of all that madness, one of the firefighters had

had the presence of mind and sensitivity to gather together some items

that obviously held emotional significance for my family.

Was it

the same guy who came out of the house with my Macbook and told me that

he had put the charger underneath a tarp over the coffee table “because I

know what a b tch it is to get those replaced ” ? I don’t know. Was it

the investigator who later attempted to console me by telling me that

what I had done was not “a criminal act ” ?

“You made a mistake. Everybody makes mistakes. He|l, I once burned down my own barn, when a trash fire got out of control.”

I don’t know.

What

I do know is that as I stared down at my daughter’s scrapbook, nestled

next to a picture of my mother and grandfather, the tears started to

flow for real. I was sandbagged by a sense of real human connection. For

what seems like a lifetime I’ve been immersed in  political warfare in

which public sector workers — our teachers, our police officers, our

firefighters — have become little more than proxies for partisan

bickering. When we read about the bankruptcy of San Bernardino, Calif.,

someone is sure to point out the firefighter who is pulling down

$ 150 , 000 grand, or complain about the cost of pension obligations.

When

we look at public sector layoffs, someone else immediately launches into

a lecture about how government austerity is crimping economic growth. Mitt Romney tells us that the “lesson” of Wisconsin

is that Americans don’t want to pay for any more teachers or

firefighters or police officers and Democrats pounce. Obama’s last

budget would cut federal support for firefighting services, but not by as much as the most recent House appropriations bill. The International Association of Firefighters claims

that government cutbacks will result in thousands more layoffs

nationwide. Republicans shrug — the IAFF is another Obama-supporting

union.

And so the bullsh|t battle rages! Far too often, we’re forgetting what our public servants do.

All I can think about, right now, is that even while risking his or her

life to beat back the flames, a Berkeley firefighter took time out to

make my daughter smile.

That firefighter deserves a raise. Put it on my next ballot, please.

http://www.salon.com/2012/07/1...

LiberalLies2012
LiberalLies2012

An African American response to the NAACP's booing of Mitt Romney.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...

3xfire3
3xfire3

LiberalLies,

"An African American response to the NAACP's booing of Mitt Romney."

Somehow this smart lady has escaped from the inner city plantation.

Black race hustlers, rich black politicians and leaders are very concerned that this might be a trend and they will lose the source of their money and positions.

MomentoMori
MomentoMori

"...polls show he enjoys 87% support among black registered voters versus 5% for Republican rival Mitt Romney."

But keep comparing Democratic policies to slavery. That'll work. Keep telling African-Americans that food stamp programs are just as bad as slavery was.

"the inner city plantation."

3x has no idea how offensive that is, on multiple levels, does he?

outsider2011
outsider2011

 

Thank go d for taxes

Politicians treat firefighters like pawns.

When my house burned down, I learned how valuable public servants can be.

The more I think about this the more amazed I become. The

firefighters told me that the fire had been an especially tricky one;

they’d had to play whack - a - mole as it darted through the back wall from

the basement to the attic. They were operating in the dark, in an old

wooden house — just a few days earlier, a similar house had caught fire

and the owner had died before the firefighters could get to her. Yet

somehow, in the midst of all that madness, one of the firefighters had

had the presence of mind and sensitivity to gather together some items

that obviously held emotional significance for my family.

Was it

the same guy who came out of the house with my Macbook and told me that

he had put the charger underneath a tarp over the coffee table “because I

know what a b tch it is to get those replaced ” ? I don’t know. Was it

the investigator who later attempted to console me by telling me that

what I had done was not “a criminal act ” ?

“You made a mistake. Everybody makes mistakes. He|l, I once burned down my own barn, when a trash fire got out of control.”

I don’t know.

What

I do know is that as I stared down at my daughter’s scrapbook, nestled

next to a picture of my mother and grandfather, the tears started to

flow for real. I was sandbagged by a sense of real human connection. For

what seems like a lifetime I’ve been immersed in  political warfare in

which public sector workers — our teachers, our police officers, our

firefighters — have become little more than proxies for partisan

bickering. When we read about the bankruptcy of San Bernardino, Calif.,

someone is sure to point out the firefighter who is pulling down

$ 150,000 grand, or complain about the cost of pension obligations.

When

we look at public sector layoffs, someone else immediately launches into

a lecture about how government austerity is crimping economic growth. Mitt Romney tells us that the “lesson” of Wisconsin

is that Americans don’t want to pay for any more teachers or

firefighters or police officers and Democrats pounce. Obama’s last

budget would cut federal support for firefighting services, but not by as much as the most recent House appropriations bill. The International Association of Firefighters claims

that government cutbacks will result in thousands more layoffs

nationwide. Republicans shrug — the IAFF is another Obama-supporting

union.

And so the bullshit battle rages! Far too often, we’re forgetting what our public servants do.

All I can think about, right now, is that even while risking his or her

life to beat back the flames, a Berkeley firefighter took time out to

make my daughter smile.

That firefighter deserves a raise. Put it on my next ballot, please.

http://www.salon.com/2012/07/1...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 

Thank go d for taxes

Politicians treat firefighters like pawns.

When my house burned down, I learned how valuable public servants can be.

The more I think about this the more amazed I become. The

firefighters told me that the fire had been an especially tricky one;

they’d had to play whack-a-mole as it darted through the back wall from

the basement to the attic. They were operating in the dark, in an old

wooden house — just a few days earlier, a similar house had caught fire

and the owner had died before the firefighters could get to her. Yet

somehow, in the midst of all that madness, one of the firefighters had

had the presence of mind and sensitivity to gather together some items

that obviously held emotional significance for my family.

Was it

the same guy who came out of the house with my Macbook and told me that

he had put the charger underneath a tarp over the coffee table “because I

know what a b tch it is to get those replaced”? I don’t know. Was it

the investigator who later attempted to console me by telling me that

what I had done was not “a criminal act”?

“You made a mistake. Everybody makes mistakes. He|l, I once burned down my own barn, when a trash fire got out of control.”

I don’t know.

What

I do know is that as I stared down at my daughter’s scrapbook, nestled

next to a picture of my mother and grandfather, the tears started to

flow for real. I was sandbagged by a sense of real human connection. For

what seems like a lifetime I’ve been immersed in  political warfare in

which public sector workers — our teachers, our police officers, our

firefighters — have become little more than proxies for partisan

bickering. When we read about the bankruptcy of San Bernardino, Calif.,

someone is sure to point out the firefighter who is pulling down

$ 150,000 grand, or complain about the cost of pension obligations.

When

we look at public sector layoffs, someone else immediately launches into

a lecture about how government austerity is crimping economic growth. Mitt Romney tells us that the “lesson” of Wisconsin

is that Americans don’t want to pay for any more teachers or

firefighters or police officers and Democrats pounce. Obama’s last

budget would cut federal support for firefighting services, but not by as much as the most recent House appropriations bill. The International Association of Firefighters claims

that government cutbacks will result in thousands more layoffs

nationwide. Republicans shrug — the IAFF is another Obama-supporting

union.

And so the bullshit battle rages! Far too often, we’re forgetting what our public servants do.

All I can think about, right now, is that even while risking his or her

life to beat back the flames, a Berkeley firefighter took time out to

make my daughter smile.

That firefighter deserves a raise. Put it on my next ballot, please.

http://www.salon.com/2012/07/1...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 

Thank god for taxes

Politicians treat firefighters like pawns.

When my house burned down, I learned how valuable public servants can be.

The more I think about this the more amazed I become. The

firefighters told me that the fire had been an especially tricky one;

they’d had to play whack-a-mole as it darted through the back wall from

the basement to the attic. They were operating in the dark, in an old

wooden house — just a few days earlier, a similar house had caught fire

and the owner had died before the firefighters could get to her. Yet

somehow, in the midst of all that madness, one of the firefighters had

had the presence of mind and sensitivity to gather together some items

that obviously held emotional significance for my family.

Was it

the same guy who came out of the house with my Macbook and told me that

he had put the charger underneath a tarp over the coffee table “because I

know what a b tch it is to get those replaced”? I don’t know. Was it

the investigator who later attempted to console me by telling me that

what I had done was not “a criminal act”?

“You made a mistake. Everybody makes mistakes. He|l, I once burned down my own barn, when a trash fire got out of control.”

I don’t know.

What

I do know is that as I stared down at my daughter’s scrapbook, nestled

next to a picture of my mother and grandfather, the tears started to

flow for real. I was sandbagged by a sense of real human connection. For

what seems like a lifetime I’ve been immersed in  political warfare in

which public sector workers — our teachers, our police officers, our

firefighters — have become little more than proxies for partisan

bickering. When we read about the bankruptcy of San Bernardino, Calif.,

someone is sure to point out the firefighter who is pulling down

$ 150,000 grand, or complain about the cost of pension obligations.

When

we look at public sector layoffs, someone else immediately launches into

a lecture about how government austerity is crimping economic growth. Mitt Romney tells us that the “lesson” of Wisconsin

is that Americans don’t want to pay for any more teachers or

firefighters or police officers and Democrats pounce. Obama’s last

budget would cut federal support for firefighting services, but not by as much as the most recent House appropriations bill. The International Association of Firefighters claims

that government cutbacks will result in thousands more layoffs

nationwide. Republicans shrug — the IAFF is another Obama-supporting

union.

And so the bullshit battle rages! Far too often, we’re forgetting what our public servants do.

All I can think about, right now, is that even while risking his or her

life to beat back the flames, a Berkeley firefighter took time out to

make my daughter smile.

That firefighter deserves a raise. Put it on my next ballot, please.

http://www.salon.com/2012/07/1...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 

Thank god for taxes

Politicians treat firefighters like pawns.

When my house burned down, I learned how valuable public servants can be.

The more I think about this the more amazed I become. The

firefighters told me that the fire had been an especially tricky one;

they’d had to play whack - a - mole as it darted through the back wall from

the basement to the attic. They were operating in the dark, in an old

wooden house — just a few days earlier, a similar house had caught fire

and the owner had died before the firefighters could get to her. Yet

somehow, in the midst of all that madness, one of the firefighters had

had the presence of mind and sensitivity to gather together some items

that obviously held emotional significance for my family.

Was it

the same guy who came out of the house with my Macbook and told me that

he had put the charger underneath a tarp over the coffee table “because I

know what a b|tch it is to get those replaced”? I don’t know. Was it

the investigator who later attempted to console me by telling me that

what I had done was not “a criminal act”?

“You made a mistake. Everybody makes mistakes. Hell, I once burned down my own barn, when a trash fire got out of control.”

I don’t know.

What

I do know is that as I stared down at my daughter’s scrapbook, nestled

next to a picture of my mother and grandfather, the tears started to

flow for real. I was sandbagged by a sense of real human connection. For

what seems like a lifetime I’ve been immersed in  political warfare in

which public sector workers — our teachers, our police officers, our

firefighters — have become little more than proxies for partisan

bickering. When we read about the bankruptcy of San Bernardino, Calif.,

someone is sure to point out the firefighter who is pulling down

$150,000 grand, or complain about the cost of pension obligations. When

we look at public sector layoffs, someone else immediately launches into

a lecture about how government austerity is crimping economic growth. Mitt Romney tells us that the “lesson” of Wisconsin

is that Americans don’t want to pay for any more teachers or

firefighters or police officers and Democrats pounce. Obama’s last

budget would cut federal support for firefighting services, but not by as much as the most recent House appropriations bill. The International Association of Firefighters claims

that government cutbacks will result in thousands more layoffs

nationwide. Republicans shrug — the IAFF is another Obama-supporting

union.

And so the bullshit battle rages! Far too often, we’re forgetting what our public servants do.

All I can think about, right now, is that even while risking his or her

life to beat back the flames, a Berkeley firefighter took time out to

make my daughter smile.

That firefighter deserves a raise. Put it on my next ballot, please.

http://www.salon.com/2012/07/1...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 

Thank god for taxes

Politicians treat firefighters like pawns.

When my house burned down, I learned how valuable public servants can b.

The more I think about this the more amazed I become. The

firefighters told me that the fire had been an especially tricky one;

they’d had to play whack-a-mole as it darted through the back wall from

the basement to the attic. They were operating in the dark, in an old

wooden house — just a few days earlier, a similar house had caught fire

and the owner had died before the firefighters could get to her. Yet

somehow, in the midst of all that madness, one of the firefighters had

had the presence of mind and sensitivity to gather together some items

that obviously held emotional significance for my family.

Was it

the same guy who came out of the house with my Macbook and told me that

he had put the charger underneath a tarp over the coffee table “because I

know what a bitch it is to get those replaced”? I don’t know. Was it

the investigator who later attempted to console me by telling me that

what I had done was not “a criminal act”?

“You made a mistake. Everybody makes mistakes. Hell, I once burned down my own barn, when a trash fire got out of control.”

I don’t know.

What

I do know is that as I stared down at my daughter’s scrapbook, nestled

next to a picture of my mother and grandfather, the tears started to

flow for real. I was sandbagged by a sense of real human connection. For

what seems like a lifetime I’ve been immersed in  political warfare in

which public sector workers — our teachers, our police officers, our

firefighters — have become little more than proxies for partisan

bickering. When we read about the bankruptcy of San Bernardino, Calif.,

someone is sure to point out the firefighter who is pulling down

$150,000 grand, or complain about the cost of pension obligations. When

we look at public sector layoffs, someone else immediately launches into

a lecture about how government austerity is crimping economic growth. Mitt Romney tells us that the “lesson” of Wisconsin

is that Americans don’t want to pay for any more teachers or

firefighters or police officers and Democrats pounce. Obama’s last

budget would cut federal support for firefighting services, but not by as much as the most recent House appropriations bill. The International Association of Firefighters claims

that government cutbacks will result in thousands more layoffs

nationwide. Republicans shrug — the IAFF is another Obama-supporting

union.

And so the bullshit battle rages! Far too often, we’re forgetting what our public servants do.

All I can think about, right now, is that even while risking his or her

life to beat back the flames, a Berkeley firefighter took time out to

make my daughter smile.

That firefighter deserves a raise. Put it on my next ballot, please.

http://www.salon.com/2012/07/1...

outsider2011
outsider2011

 When the Boston Globe reported yesterday that

Mitt Romney continued to be listed as Bain Capital’s president, CEO,

chairman and sole shareholder on SEC documents long after he claims to

have left the company, Bain responded with this explanation:

“Due

to the sudden nature of Mr. Romney’s departure, he remained the sole

stockholder for a time while formal ownership was being documented and

transferred to the group of partners who took over management of the

firm in 1999,”

The problem with this: Romney himself

provided a different – and more sensible – explanation when he appeared

before the Massachusetts State Ballot Law Commission in 2002:

“When

I left my employer in Massachusetts in February of 1999 to accept the

Olympic assignment, I left on the basis of a leave of absence,

indicating that I, by virtue of that title, would return at the end of

the Olympics to my employment at Bain Capital, but subsequently decided

not to do so and entered into a departure agreement with my former

partners, I use that in the colloquial sense, not legal sense, but my

former partners,”

What Romney said a decade ago makes a lot more sense than what he and Bain are saying now.

When

Romney agreed in early 1999 to run the Salt Lake Organizing Committee,

there was no reason for him to think he’d jump right back into politics

when the games were over – and every reason for him to assume he’d

return to his private equity work. In fact, by 1999 he’d already taken

two similar leaves of absence, one to run Bain and Company in 1991 and

1992 and another when he campaigned for the U.S. Senate from November

1993 to November 1994. After each of those leaves, he came right back to

Bain Capital.

Romney now argues that February 1999 should be

considered his exit date from Bain, and that he ceased to have any input

into the company’s activities after that point. But it’s important to

remember the circumstances under which he first made that claim.

We

tend now to think of Romney’s political rise as a seamless transition

in 2002 from Olympic glory to the Massachusetts governorship. But his

opening to run for office that year didn’t come about until very late in

his Olympic tenure. Romney was clearly interested in a political future

when he took the Salt Lake gig, but there were no opportunities on the

horizon in Massachusetts. Both Senate seats were safely held by

Democrats, while a Republican, Paul Cellucci, had just been elected to a

full term, and there was reason to believe that he would run again in

2002. And even when Cellucci left in early 2001 to become ambassador to

Canada, it still didn’t help Romney, since it was assumed the party

would close ranks behind his successor, Jane Swift.It was only in

late 2001, when Swift’s governorship began to implode, that running in

2002 became a serious option for Romney. And it was only in 2002 that

Romney actually struck a severance agreement with Bain. Before Swift’s

demise, Romney’s only other possible post-Olympic political opportunity

had involved Utah’s governorship, which was possibly going to open up in

2004. In the summer of ’01, Romney took some tentative steps

to put his name in the mix for that race, but it was still several

years away and there were real questions about how viable he’d be if he

ran.In other words, it makes all the sense in the world that he

would have held on to his leadership titles at Bain and planned to

return after the games. For most of the time he was in Utah, politics

was not a realistic option for Romney’s immediate post-Olympic career.

And because of this, it makes all the sense in the world that Romney

would have remained apprised of Bain’s activities while in Utah and

maintained some level of engagement, even if he wasn’t directly involved

in the company’s day-to-day activities. That’s pretty much what Romney told the ballot commission in June ’02,

when he termed his ’99 departure a leave of absence and explained that

during his Salt Lake years he’d come back to the state for “a number of

social trips and business trips that brought me back to Massachusetts,

board meetings, Thanksgiving and so forth.”Romney didn’t start pushing the idea that he’d severed all ties with Bain in ’99 until late in the ’02 campaign, when Democrats played up

Bain’s closure of a Kansas City steel plant, a move that cost 700

workers their jobs. Confronted with this potentially damaging attack,

Romney pleaded ignorance, insisting he couldn’t have had anything to do

with the closure because it came two years after he’d left. That’s the

story he’s stuck with ever since – and especially this year, as national

Democrats have taken up the GST story.The point here isn’t that

Romney was running Bain Capital and making all of its key decisions from

1999 to 2002. But the story he tells now absolves him of all

responsibility for anything and everything Bain did in those years. This

would be reasonable if Romney had forged a clear and total break with

the company in 1999, but he didn’t. His statement to the ballot law

commission 10 years ago was supported by just about all of his actions

between 1999 and 2002: Until the final few months of his Olympic tenure,

Romney’s break from Bain was supposed to temporary.http://www.salon.com/2012/07/13/why_m...

lreed580
lreed580

Howard Fineman in an article at HuffPo said of Romney:

"The impressiion you get is of a guy who was whatever the form in front of him required him to be."

sacredh
sacredh

Bain responded with this explanation:

“Dueto the sudden nature of Mr. Romney’s departure, he remained the sole stockholder for a time while formal ownership was being documented and transferred to the group of partners who took over management of the firm in 1999,”

Shorter version. He took the money and ran.

Ivy_B
Ivy_B

But if it wasn't true, the forms filed with the SEC were wrong.

Of course the tax returns could clear up the questions.

LiberalLies2012
LiberalLies2012

Gallup found in April that Republicans were five points more likely to vote than Democrats. More recent measures, including by the Pew Research Center in June, show Republican voters displaying more intense interest than Democrats. If 2008 stay-at-home Republicans vote, Mr. Obama's margin would shrink by more than one-third (to 6.1 million). Similarly, the 2.4 million veterans who voted in 2004 but did not in 2008 could turn out in 2012. Mr. McCain's winning margin among vets was 10 points.

Nor can Mr. Obama count on winning the support of 9% of Republicans—or roughly 3.7 million—as he did in 2008 (according to exit polls). If he instead wins the same 6% of Republicans as Sen. John Kerry did in 2004, then 1.25 million Obama Republicans would be subtracted from the president's column and added to Mr. Romney's. That would narrow Mr. Obama's popular-vote margin to 3.6 million.

According to the exit polls, Mr. Obama won independents by eight points in 2008 (52% vs. 44% for Mr. McCain). But the July 1 CNN/Opinion Research poll showed Mr. Romney winning independents by seven points, 49% to 42%. The June 24 Gallup poll found Mr. Romney up by one among independents, 43% to 42%. Independents will shift back and forth, but if they split 49% to 49% (with the rest going to minor candidates), then Mr. Obama's vote total would be shaved by 1.1 million and Mr. Romney's would grow by an equal amount, cutting the president's margin to 1.4 million.

http://online.wsj.com/article/...

nflfoghorn
nflfoghorn

How does all that translate into electoral votes, Rusty?

sacredh
sacredh

So, basically what you're saying is that everything has to shift in Romney's favor for him to make it close. If Obama is the most hated President in history, wouldn't Romney be something? Like leading in the polls? As it stands now, the most hated/unpopular/devisive President in history is still more popular than Mittens of the Swiss Bank Accounts.

.

Obama went to Switzerland to pick up a Nobel Peace Prize. Romney went there to hide money.

LiberalLies2012
LiberalLies2012

Obama went to Switzerland to pick up a Nobel Peace Prize.
Switzerland, Sweden ....oh good grief who cares, right?

LOL you dolts make it so easy, I swear.  

bobell
bobell

What?  You never saw "Trading Places"?

Jamie Lee Schwartz looks great in a dirndl.

sacredh
sacredh

Tero1, I try to say at least 6 incorrect things before breakfast.

Tero1
Tero1

I'm actually surprised you caught that Rusty. What with you being a semi-literate ignoramus and all...

Shame on you sacredh! Being corrected by a bagger... tsk tsk tsk

nflfoghorn
nflfoghorn

What will you change your handle to after November 6?  LiberalWhys?  LiberalHighs?  NeoconSighs?

sacredh
sacredh

It's a foreign country so it doesn't matter which one it actually was. All I know is that they speak French.

LiberalLies2012
LiberalLies2012

Even in his own words, it rings true.

Run on  your record Obama.  Run on YOUR record.  

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...

3xfire3
3xfire3

LiberalLies,

"Run on your record Obama. Run on YOUR record."

He can't. If he did he would lose by a landslide.

he will probably lose by a landslide anyway.

nflfoghorn
nflfoghorn

I keep wondering where you get all this empirical evidence to the contrary of what most pollsters are receiving. 

LiberalLies2012
LiberalLies2012

"President Obama believes that millions of Americans have lost their homes, their jobs and their livelihood because he failed to tell a good story. Being president is not about telling stories. Being president is about leading, and President Obama has failed to lead. No wonder Americans are losing faith in his presidency."

The above quote is from Mitt Romney after the TV interview of Barack Hussein Obama and his wife, Michelle appeared on CBS.  

http://www.weeklystandard.com/...

This entire administration has been nothing but a far left liberal fairytale.  Filled with "hopes and dreams", and "fundamentally transforming America".  No one expresses it better than Michelle Obama herself.

"All of this for a damn flag?"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...

nflfoghorn
nflfoghorn

Must've taken your Paulie vitamin today.

LogicLoop
LogicLoop

 Na, I think its more that today is a pretty rough day for Rusty in the news. What with all the Mitt getting busted either lying or... lying.

nflfoghorn
nflfoghorn

Feign???

WE never operated an investment company and didn't know when we were no longer affiliated with it.

WE didn't lay off people.

WE didn't create the recession.

And WE didn't block the president from implementing programs that create jobs.

Tero1
Tero1

"People don't care about Romney's life at Bain and when he did or didn't leave the company.  What they do care about are JOBS."

I love how you presume to talk for "people". You are a fringe-dwelling nut and fortunately there are not many of you. I also love how whenever you baggers get tired or boxed in in an argument you just go back to the "where are the jobs?" thing. I will tell you where the jobs the are; overseas. Who's responsible; Mitt Romney and others like him.

outsider2011
outsider2011

 You didn't answer the question.

What specifically, were left wing policies?

LiberalLies2012
LiberalLies2012

This Bain feign from the left is nothing more than political show to distort the fact this country is going down the tubes under the hand of Barack Hussein Obama.  

People don't care about Romney's life at Bain and when he did or didn't leave the company.  What they do care about are JOBS.

When Obama starts pulling JOBS out of his arse, then maybe they will look up and pay attention.  Until then, he's toast.  

outsider2011
outsider2011

What policies - specifically - were left wing?

Don't cast about empty phrases/talking points - what has he done that was left wing?